X-Rite goes big with the ColorChecker Video XL

Sep 10, 2018

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

X-Rite goes big with the ColorChecker Video XL

Sep 10, 2018

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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It’s funny, I was just thinking the other day that X-Rite should release a giant ColorChecker for drone photographers. And, well, they haven’t quite done that (yet). But what they have done is release a giant ColorChecker Video for aerial filmmakers. X-Rite has today announced the new ColorChecker Video XL. It’s like the ColorChecker Video, but bigger. Much bigger.

The X-Rite ColorChecker family is starting to get a little confusing, but there are essentially five products now. Two for stills photographers and three for filmmakers.

Each of the products for the two different users offers the same functionality in each of the different sizes. Just some are more convenient for some shoots than others.

The two Passport products, as the name suggests, are about the same size as your standard passport. In fact, whenever DIYP visits the shows, I usually have both ColorChecker Passports tucked into the Passport wallet of the Think Tank Credential Holder. They’re very handy when you’re working quick on the move, out on location, and you can easily zoom in or move closer to fill the frame with a small target.

The next size up is the regular version, and you can read our full review of the ColorChecker Video right here. I’ve found that this size works best in a studio environment, where you might need to point multiple cameras at it that are already locked off with fixed focal lengths. Having it a bit bigger lets you cover those wide shots and close-ups in the studio with ease.

And then there’s new X-Rite ColorChecker Video XL, which measures a whopping 23″ x 19.5″ (53.3 x 37.5cm). They say that’s twice as large as the regular sized ColorChecker Video, for circumstances where you can’t get the camera too close. Although, it’s actually quite a bit larger than twice the size. The regular sized ColorChecker Video is 8.25″ x 11″ (21.59 x 27.94cm). So, this thing is monstrous.

Obviously, though, when flying a drone, the smaller targets may present something of a risk to the person holding them. The wide lenses on most drones mean that it has to get quite close, because you need to have the targets fairly sizeable in the frame to be able to make use of them in the software afterwards. This is where the ColorChecker Video XL steps in, to let you fill more of the frame at a safe distance.

It’s a great idea and will be a valuable tool for drone filmmakers, especially if they want to match footage with cameras on the ground.

The X-Rite ColorChecker VideoXL comes either on its own, with a simple carry sleeve or with a more robust and configurable carrying case.

I can’t find any US prices yet, but the UK prices are…

  • ColorChecker Video XL – £396
  • ColorChecker VideoXL + Sleeve – £426
  • ColorChecker Video XL + Carrying Case – £492

For US customers, keep an eye out in the usual places. It should be coming soon.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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