The ColorChecker Passport is finally compatible with Capture One

Jan 9, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

The ColorChecker Passport is finally compatible with Capture One

Jan 9, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Over the past several years I’ve found the ColorChecker Passport to be an invaluable tool for my photography. It lets me get consistent colour weeks or months apart, even using different cameras. But it has one slight drawback. It’s only really compatible with Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. And more recently, DNG Profile support was added to Skylum Luminar.

But one of the things that’s kept many people from adopting the ColorChecker is Capture One support. It’s also one of the things that stopped many ColorChecker users from switching away from Lightroom to Capture One. But now, all that changes as X-Rite announces Capture One support has been added to the ColorChecker Camera Calibration software v1.2 (Public Beta).

YouTube video

X-Rite’s software enters a public beta version 1.2, and the process is quite simple.

  1. Photograph a ColorChecker Passport or any ColorChecker Classic in raw file format
  2. Process the file in Capture One using the recommended settings and output a TIFF
  3. Run the TIFF through the Camera Calibration software v1.2 to create your custom ICC profile.
  4. Quit and reopen Capture One.

And that’s it, the profile’s right there ready to use. X-Rite also posted a video of the whole workflow to show the right settings.

YouTube video

If you want to try the ColorChecker with your copy of Capture One, you can download the new Public Beta version of the software from the X-Rite website. Remember, though, this is a Public Beta. It is a work in development. So, just be warned that things might not always work as perfectly as you’d like. If you face issues, be sure to let the folks at X-Rite know, so they can fix it.

But if you’ve been on the fence about either the ColorChecker or Capture One due to lack of a clean compatible workflow between the two, maybe this will make your decision a little easier.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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10 responses to “The ColorChecker Passport is finally compatible with Capture One”

  1. David Shepherd Avatar
    David Shepherd

    There is no point to this in Capture One. The color checker is needed in Photoshop and Lightroom because Adobe did not find value in creating optimized profiles for supported cameras. Also, This process will be flawed because a the difference in Tiff and Raw will respond with variance. I’m interested in seeing how this works, but I am not convinced that this is needed in CaptureOne Pro.

    1. Daniel Hager Avatar
      Daniel Hager

      Hey, while Capture One’s native profiles for cameras are really good, there are scenarios when further corrections towards an established standard can be very helpful.

      I have mentioned a few examples in my article on this: ICC correction Profiles For Capture One

      1. David Shepherd Avatar
        David Shepherd

        I can understand what the potential for Color Checker with color can provide, but it’s only ”needed” for Lightroom IMO. The inherent flaw with solely relying on the color checker is that the ”custom” profile doesn’t not guarantee accurate color. It may help so don’t get me wrong, but you can not rely on anything but a proof print. Now, if the custom profile is your starting point, great and there is nothing wrong with that. But Capture One Pro is a more accurate starting point and proper white balance will solve color problems off the top. After that, it you will need specific shifts in color then you need to Proof your colors.

        I work in Print and we look at color everyday. While the Color Check passport helps sometimes, we do not rely on them because they are not requirement in our workflow with capture one.

        1. Mark Harris Avatar
          Mark Harris

          No C1 is not a more accurate stating point! Do you even understand how absurd that statement is??? Unless Capture one was developed at Hogwarts, is not possible that it can magically know how your photo was taken to be more accurate lol

      2. David Shepherd Avatar
        David Shepherd

        Quick follow-up: So how did Color Checker Passport ”correct” you color?

        Did Color Checker shift color only? Did it add saturation or luminosity? Did CC keep you image withing DMax for your working color space? What happen when you convert the file to another color space or export for output? Is your color out of gamut? What happens when your colors are out of gamut? What happens when your image exposure is not accurate or consistent?

        These are some of the issues that CC either do not address or cause problems when you do not proof your work. It doesn’t happen every time nor is CC evil but you must be aware of the implications.

    2. Mark Harris Avatar
      Mark Harris

      LOL..this IS needed no matter what because Capture One cannot know the exact situation under which you took your photos. You clearly do not understand how this works.

  2. Roy Bridgewood Avatar
    Roy Bridgewood

    Capture one offers no support for many cameras. I use x-rite as a valuable part of my editing process
    With capture One The colour checker passport would be photographed on set and used to gain targeted colour reference this was done more for reasurance than calibration

  3. Mihael Tominšek Avatar
    Mihael Tominšek

    It seems I can’t figure out this :(
    Making DNG profile for raw DNG of my Pentax, made a HUGE difference in Lightroom and it make sense, to profile raw file. But this TIFF profiling that was already open in developer and processed, this I do not get it? Should I WB or not, exposure correct or not, what to do ar not to do to file before export TIFF for ICC profile.

    All in all every possible option I tested profile was MUCH WORSE than generic. It truncates all dynamic range, colors are muted and image become warm seppia, highlights and shadows clipped as soon as I move a slider… really not what I expected.

    any hints about that?

  4. Mihael Tominšek Avatar
    Mihael Tominšek

    It seem I can’t nail this. Exporting linear response TIFF without any color correction but still created ICC clips highlights and inflates shadows…

    1. Mark Harris Avatar
      Mark Harris

      The capture one process is a MESS and flawed. Already discussed at DPReview. What cant capture one just do it nicely like Lightroom and PhotoNinja do?