Sigma’s new 16mm f/1.4 DC DN lens for mirrorless cameras is now here and official

Oct 24, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Sigma’s new 16mm f/1.4 DC DN lens for mirrorless cameras is now here and official

Oct 24, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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As yesterday’s leaked photos show, Sigma are indeed bringing us a new lens for mirrorless users. Now, though, it’s not a leak or rumour any more, though. Today, Sigma have officially announced their new 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary lens for mirrorless cameras. Specifically, that means Sony and Micro Four Thirds photographers – sorry Fuji shooters.

Sigma boast that this is the world’s first interchangeable lens for Sony mirrorless APS-C cameras which offers a 24mm full frame equivalent field of view at such a wide aperture. For Micro Four Thirds users, that’s a 32mm full frame equivalent field of view. Even with the 2x crop, though, it’s a lens micro four thirds shooters will have been waiting for.

Developed as a lightweight, compact lens for every day use, Sigma say that the optical quality of this lens rivals that of its legendary Art series. A bold claim to make. It’s the second lens in Sigma’s DC DN Contemporary series, adding to the existing 30mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary.

  • Focal Length : 16mm
  • Sony APS-C equivalent field of view : 24mm
  • Micro Four Thirds equivalent field of view : 32mm
  • Max aperture : f/1.4
  • Min aperture : f/16
  • Aperture blades : 9
  • Elements : 16 elements in 13 groups
  • Filter diameter : 57mm
  • Dust and splash-proof
  • Designed to minimise flare and ghosting
  • Comes with lens hood
  • Quiet autofocus stepper motor
  • Dimensions : 72.2mm x 92.3mm (2.8″ x 3.6″)
  • Weight : 405g (13.3oz)

Sigma haven’t officially killed off their 19mm f/2.8 DN, 30mm f/2.8 DN and 60mm f/2.8 DN Art series lenses, yet. But, I would imagine at least the 30mm probably isn’t getting quite as many sales as it once did. With the 16mm now coming soon, the 19mm may also see quite a drop.

Along with the new lens announcement Sigma have posted a roadmap showing that a new DC CN Contemporary alternative to the 60mm f/2.8 DN Art lens is also on the way.

Looking at where it’s positioned relative to the existing 60mm, I think we could be looking at possibly a 55mm f/1.4 lens. This would offer a field of view equivalent to 82.5mm on a full frame sensor. Pretty close to 85mm, a favourite amongst many portrait photographers. For Micro Four Thirds users, a 55mm would offer 110mm full frame equivalent field of view. Again fairly close to another popular full frame focal length, 105mm, amongst portrait photographers. Even with the slightly deeper depth of field on the smaller sensor relative to the field of view, that would be a very welcome lens for either format.

As for the 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary, though, availability and prices are still to come. But we’ll post as soon as we hear any new information.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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