Photographer Terry Richardson banned from working with Vogue and other high profile magazines

Oct 24, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Photographer Terry Richardson banned from working with Vogue and other high profile magazines

Oct 24, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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This is news that’s going to make a great deal of people pretty happy. The Telegraph reports that controversial fashion photographer Terry Richardson has been banned from working with Vogue and other leading magazines. They say an email circulating the company this week announced that the company is no longer working with him.

They go on to instruct staff that commissioned or already completed, but unpublished work from Richardson should be “killed or substituted with other material”. Given the controversy surrounding his career, many have wondered how he’s kept working with the biggest brands and names in the world. Now, in the wake of the Weinstein controversy, that seems to be coming to an end.

The Telegraph say that Richardson’s contract with Condé Nast International had been under dispute for some time already. Over the weekend, an article in The Times asked why Richard was still being “feted by fashionistas”. Well, it looks like the fashionistas took note.

As reported, Condé Nast International executive vice president, James Woolhouse sent out the email on Monday which read…

I am writing to you on an important matter. Condé Nast would like to no longer work with the photographer Terry Richardson.

Any shoots that you have been commission[ed] or any shoots that have been completed but not yet published, should be killed and substituted with other material.

Please could you confirm that this policy will be actioned in your market effective immediately. Thank you for your support in this matter.

Richardson has been mired with sexual misconduct allegations for years. He’s denied the accusations throughout his career, as one would expect. But you can only hear it from so many people before you have to believe that at least some of it, if not all of it, maybe true.

In March 2014 (and not “Friday”, as the Telegraph reports) Richardson posted a letter on the Huffington Post blog. This was in response to accusations of sexual misconduct made at the time. It was posted to “correct” the rumours surrounding him, his career and these allegations.

I collaborated with consenting adult women who were fully aware of the nature of the work, and as is typical with any project, everyone signed releases. I have never used an offer of work or a threat of rebuke to coerce someone into something that they did not want to do.

I give everyone that I work with enough respect to view them as having ownership of their free will and making their decisions accordingly, and as such, it has been difficult to see myself as a target of revisionist history.

He then goes on to blame the “fake news”.

Sadly, in the on-going quest for controversy-generated page views, sloppy journalism fueled by sensationalized, malicious, and manipulative recountings of this work has given rise to angry Internet crusades. Well-intentioned or not, they are based on lies.

Well, one thing that’s not a lie, according to the Telegraph, is that Richardson has been blacklisted from Condé Nast. And given some of the high profile brands in their portfolio, that will be quite a big chunk of Richardson’s career going bye bye. If not all of it. I can’t imagine too many others will work with him now, having been dumped so publicly by such a high profile brand.

i-D’s magazine editor, Caryn Franklyn has said that Richardson’s behaviour had become an “open secret” in the modelling industry. Given the number of articles and accusations about him over the years, it seems it’s been an “open secret” for quite a while.

The Weinstein controversy has opened up the gates for people to come forward about sexual misconduct in many areas of the entertainment industry. Former model, Cameron Russel, has also been using her Instagram account to share anonymous stories of harassment recently. She is also urging people to post their own experiences using the hashtag, #MyJobShouldNotIncludeAbuse.

Hopefully, now, more of these predators will finally get what’s coming to them, and their victims can get some kind of justice and closure.

Personally, in the case of Richardson, I’m not sure blacklisting him goes far enough. It’s definitely a good start, though. While I’ve no doubt his chances of being hired in the future, by anybody are slim-to-none, he’s already made enough money that it doesn’t matter. He’s just being forced to retire early.

[via The Telegraph]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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19 responses to “Photographer Terry Richardson banned from working with Vogue and other high profile magazines”

  1. Taylor Maduro Port Avatar
    Taylor Maduro Port

    Good. Hes shit his work is shit

  2. Paul Richards Avatar
    Paul Richards

    Don’t know why they ever worked with him. His photography is pretty crap in my opinion

  3. Jeff Ridout Avatar
    Jeff Ridout

    He’s a shitty person and his work is terrible. It’s grunge porn. its nothing new nor nothing good.

  4. Tj Ó Seamállaigh Avatar
    Tj Ó Seamállaigh

    I know it is a sensitive matter but how does this work? I mean, anyone could go and accuse someone of abuse and the media goes with that? Not sure about much here as all I read in this article (and about the Weinstein case, not much interest in it though) is that people make statements to the media about getting abused by this or that – I think there must be some clue, no? Would I get away with going to the media or even the court and say some person abused me? I think such behavior from the media can be easily used and dedicated solely to the destruction of someone’s career and reputation, and simply based on no concrete evidence. Beside that, why those “victims” did not report those incidents earlier, at the time of their occurrence? Why now it’s coming together like a clot?

    1. Renato Murakami Avatar
      Renato Murakami

      It’s just the way it goes for subjects like that, there’s simply no other way.

      On one hand, yes, there can definitely be false claims, accusations, people writting bullshit to ruin other people’s lives, and character destruction overall.
      It doesn’t happen a whole lot though. Unless there are some mental issues involved, people are not often willing to be seen as victims of abuse just because they hold a grudge. Women know that in current paternalistic societies, there’s still a backlash to be had in cases like these, quite unfortunately.

      But on the other hand, there’s a lot of abuse that goes on untold because it’s a sensitive matter. There’s a lot of victim blaming going around when it comes to public denouncements, lots of reports come together like a clot because once one person has enough courage to expose herself/himself, everyone who was also a victim decides to expose their stories too, stuff like that. Most people don’t want private and personal stories being exposed and scrutinized by public opinnion, or just want to forget of horrible episodes in their lives and move on, so it gets really complicated. There’s a whole lot of confusion and situations that happen in abuse scenarios, it’s not as simple as reporting incidents earlier when they happened. Predators tend to target vulnerable people, or people that are in a vulnerable position, and threat to do something if they report what happened. I’ll fire you, you’ll never get a job on the fashion industry, I’ll expose all the photos I have of you, drag your name in the mud, etc etc.

      There is a fine line between being flirty and abusive, and the closer the attitude is on that frontier, the harder it is to accuse someone of something. Lots of women can tolerate a whole lot before going public with it.

      There’s no easy way to confirm or deny claims as they most likely happened in the past, but in some cases multiple accounts and testimonials will help give credibility to one side or another.

      In the case of Richardson though, it’s pretty well estabilished that he was scum. There have been multiple separate cases going into very detailed accounts, and multiple confirmations of his behaviour. In fact, it’s appaling that it took this long for these magazines to cut him off. He is famous, and he most likely didn’t abuse MOST of the models he worked with, so the industry was tolerant of cases that happened because he was probably still seen as an asset.

      But really, the guy should definitely be in jail for the stuff he did. His behavior doesn’t only show up in multiple model accounts, but also on his attitude and statements he gave himself in interviews. People who are in doubt about this case in particular, just look it up. Guy is pure unadulterated predator material. The magazines are cutting him off because it’s finally reaching a tipping point where models probably don’t want anything to do with the guy.

    2. Marja Avatar
      Marja

      Said victims often *do* report these incidences at the time they happen. Bill Cosby, for example, has been accused of sexual assault since the 1970’s, possibly earlier.

      Richardson horror stories have been around for ages; I’ve heard them for at least ten years, and that’s just from derping around on the internet.

      The sad thing is, it doesn’t matter when they come forward, because the result is often “Liar! Slut! Greedy attention whore!” Livelihoods get threatened, blacklisting happens, articles get erased.

      In cases like where high school girls are assaulted by sportball team members, an entire school can turn against the accuser, sending death threats, etc.

      Also, the attacks are traumatizing. Nobody wants to relive the graphic details over and over, much less in open court with the attacker right there. And that retelling can go on for a couple years, the way court cases stretch out.

  5. Howardo Mansfieldio Avatar
    Howardo Mansfieldio

    The quality of some of his work is good. Not exceptional by any means, but good. He’s certainly not incompetent.
    However, if I could get away with a compact camera and direct flash against a white wall for the money he gets, I’d be tempted to be that lazy too.

    I started “proper” photography in 2008 and learned about this guy shortly after. If the stories are true, then he’ll just carry on producing his “art” books and doing commissions, sticking bits of himself into anyone he wishes, willing or unwilling (allegedly).
    While he’s being publicly flogged now, whatever connections/favours/blackmail material he has that has left him untouched for all those years will still work in his favor privately now.

  6. Brian Drourr Avatar
    Brian Drourr

    He needs to be in jail. The shitbag is a predator and a crappy photographer

  7. Dieter Greven Avatar
    Dieter Greven

    After all, he made it. You didn’t. Period.

  8. David Lorenzo Avatar
    David Lorenzo

    Pervy maybe but he did create a whole style of photography.

  9. Brenda Lee Avatar
    Brenda Lee

    I give it about three seconds for every celebrity who knows him to come out of the woodwork claiming they knew he was horrible all along but were too afraid to say anything, Despite having willingly worked with him on multiple occasions and partying at his house.

  10. Carlos Gouveia Avatar
    Carlos Gouveia

    Crap

  11. Kryn Sporry Avatar
    Kryn Sporry

    For that question posted as part of the question, I would respond “did he get convicted?”. Not condoning the alleged offences, not even close. But there’s a system in place. Stop grabbing your pitch forks and torches, and Let the system do its work.

  12. Adrian J Nyaoi Avatar
    Adrian J Nyaoi

    There you go Uncle Terry.

  13. Kevin Auld Avatar
    Kevin Auld

    The question “does blacklisting go far enough” can only reasonably be answered (mob mentality not withstanding) by “it depends on if the rumours / charges / accusations are true”.

  14. Tronn Hansen Avatar
    Tronn Hansen

    Not a great photog, even worse person.

  15. Shark Avatar
    Shark

    that piece of scum should go to prison. that ugly disgusting swine without any moral…

  16. suruha Avatar
    suruha

    Without drawing too much fire in return, I can say what I tend to believe is the main problem with all of this ‘coming out’ stuff. This is a paternalistic society. Men are more important and valuable. Women are subservient. Women are here to cater to men and to do as told by men. Up until the late 18th century, women were chattel, owned by their husbands. That attitude still exists, to an extent, today, I’m sorry to say.
    I’ve been abused, raped, treated differently on the work site, not been taken seriously, you name it. It has happened. It is so common place it isn’t funny. Yet, every single incident was heart breaking and painful. I still feel the pains of some of the ‘situations’ I have been in. I didn’t intentionally put myself in them. They were just circumstances. But, the problem in reporting it can bring more pain. There is a tendency for folks to blame the victim, like, “Well, she must have brought it on!” “Look at the way she dresses!”
    More than likely, though, it would cause a lot of harm and ruckus to bring it out it the open. One of the guys who dealt out some of my abuse was a friend’s brother. We wouldn’t be friends any longer if I told. Or, as in what is happening lately, one may lose their job if they don’t ‘put out’. There’s always a consequence and many women look at that as opposed to coming clean and telling all.
    By far, in my opinion, the very worst ‘excuse’ that I have heard is, “Boys will be boys!” Grrr! Being a male does not give any male any more rights, particularly to my body and my life! Period!
    Unfortunately, all of this had led me to be extremely cautious. I look for red flags more than anything when I meet someone. It is very sad to say that the flags are usually there. As a result, I prefer to stay alone. I don’t look at it as a sacrifice, though. I just refuse to be a victim anymore.
    Thank you.
    Su

  17. Thames Sinclair Avatar
    Thames Sinclair

    You know what? Amazon actually sells “50 Shades of Grey”.

    Amazon sells millions of book titles. Amazon sells Hustler magazines. In what kind of victorian age you live to get upset about a sexual guidebook? What is wrong with you people mindlessly equating sex with rape? You probably recognize the difference between voluntary (even if suggested) donation and theft? If there are people getting aroused by certain photography settings, what’s the problem? Is this evil already? Let them hump if they feel like it! As long as everyone is aware that no means no, and behaves accordingly, everything is fine. And as long as the book doesn’t suggest anything else, there’s no need for shaming it.