Sachtler Cine Series fluid heads hold camera rigs up to 50kg

Feb 14, 2024

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Sachtler Cine Series fluid heads hold camera rigs up to 50kg

Feb 14, 2024

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Sachtler Cine Series Fluid Heads

Sachtler has announced three new fluid tripod heads. They fall under the new Cine Series banner, with three models appearing at launch. There’s the Cine 20 (buy here), the Cine 30 (buy here) and the heavy-duty Cine 50 (buy here).

Each of the three heads is designed for a different type of filmmaker with different demands. From smaller mirrorless rigs with cages, monitors and gadgets to the ARRI Alexa, Sachtler’s Cine Series has you all covered.

Sachtler Cine 20

I’m putting this one first and on its own because it’s probably the one most applicable to users on here as it fits in a 100mm bowl head. While on the large side, with many users still preferring less expensive 75mm bowl head tripods, 100mm isn’t out reach.

Sachtler Cine 20

The Sachtler Cine 20 fits in a 100mm bowl head and offers a load capacity of 2-22kg. This is a very wide range, covering everything from a basic mirrorless camera, (large) lens, microphone, etc. up to a fully decked out rig with an external monitor, V-Mount batteries, video and audio transmitters and receivers… The works.

Naturally, Sachtler suggests this head go with the Sachtler Flowtech 100 carbon fibre legs. Of course, it should work just fine on any set of sticks with a 100mm bowl on top – including those from Sachtler’s sister companies, Vinten, OConnor and Manfrotto.

That being said, Sachtler does make some great tripod legs, so they’re worth looking into. Remember that time we dunked one in the Dead Sea?

Sachtler Cine 30 & Cine 50

These two are going together here as they’re both 150mm bowl heads. These are substantial heads for substantial cameras. The Cine 30 has a load capacity of 3-32kg, which is a pretty significant increase over the Cine 20.

Sachtler Cine 30

It still allows the user of smaller (relatively speaking) rigs with mirrorless cameras, while also covering larger, heavier camera setups. It’s a nice transition head for those who make use of both types of cameras.

The Cine 50, on the other hand, is pretty much only for huge cameras. With a load capacity of 10-50kg, you’ll struggle to meet the minimum requirements for this one with a mirrorless rig. It’s an absolute monster, designed for very heavy, high-end cinema and broadcast cameras.

Sachtler Cine 50

Sachtler Cine Series Specs

Ace M Mk IIAce XL Mk II
Bowl size75mm75mm
Payload0-4kg0-8kg
Counterbalance Steps9+05+0
Pan and Tilt drag3 Steps3 Steps
Tilt Range+90° to -75°+90° to -75°
Sliding Plate Range4.1″4.1″

Price and Availability

The Sachtler Cine 20 is available to pre-order now for $6,650. The Sachtler Cine 30 is available as a special order for $11,305, and the Sachtler Cine 50 is available also as a special order for $14,012.50. It is also available in various packages with and without tripod legs throughout the world.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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