If Spiderman And a Drone Had a Baby, The Drone Catcher Would Be It

Jan 19, 2016

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

If Spiderman And a Drone Had a Baby, The Drone Catcher Would Be It

Jan 19, 2016

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Drone Catcher

Irresponsible and ill-intentioned drone operators continue to pose safety and security hazards, and researchers continue to develop inventive ways of taking out the rogue devices.

The Drone Catcher is not the first anti-drone solution nor the first anti-drone drone, but it’s definitely the closest one to possessing superhero capabilities.

Developed by Michigan Tech’s HIRo Lab (Human-Interactive Robotics), the Drone Catcher fires a net at other drones and catches them mid-air.

The Drone Catcher system is a patent-pending proof of concept prototype intended to “intercept and physically remove the intruding multi-rotor drones from the protected areas,” HIRo Lab wrote on YouTube.

According to Michigan Tech, Mo Rastgaaran, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Michigan Technological University, came up with the idea when he was watching World Cup soccer and heard there were snipers protecting the crowd.

“I thought, ‘If the threat is a drone, you really don’t want to shoot it down—it might contain explosives and blow up. What you want to do is catch it and get it out of there,’” Rastgaar said.

The Drone Catcher flies up to the intruding drone and like a flying version of Spiderman it fires a net to catch its target, without posing a safety risk itself. It can be controlled by a human pilot, work autonomously or a mix of the two.

The net can be launched from up to 40 feet away and thanks to its size and speedy deployment, developers say it can “overwhelm even the fastest, most maneuverable small drone”.

YouTube video

Other solutions, such as the Dronedefender and NASA’s Virtual Safety Net, allow you to force-land invading drones, but the Drone Catcher offers a solution when force-landing or shooting (your neighbor’s) drone out of the sky is not an option.

We’ve recently seen another drone-hunting drone from Japan which will also retrieve or remove the other drone, but the Drone Catcher seems to be less cumbersome; not to mention a hell of a lot cooler.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 responses to “If Spiderman And a Drone Had a Baby, The Drone Catcher Would Be It”

  1. Micha Kohlmann Avatar
    Micha Kohlmann

    Kay Sascha e spidermandrohne ?
    Ich vrreegg haha.
    Shut up and take my money

  2. Tod Heckert Avatar
    Tod Heckert

    do that to my drone and I will take you to court.

    1. Shayne Avatar
      Shayne

      Fly in restricted areas, fly irresponsibly, or cause danger to yourself/others/animals – then they can take you to court (and pretty much anyone who witnesses you). Id much rather have them do this than the latter :) Fly safe & fly responsibly and you may never meet this net.