German lighting manufacturer Hensel goes into provisional insolvency

Jul 2, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

German lighting manufacturer Hensel goes into provisional insolvency

Jul 2, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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We appear to have another casualty in the increasingly competitive strobe market. According to ProfiFoto, The District Court of Würzburg has ordered the provisional insolvency administration of the assets of German lighting manufacturer Hensel-Visit GmbH & Co. KG (Hensel). This isn’t bankruptcy or the end of the business, yet, although the company does have a significant challenge on its hands.

Essentially, insolvency is when a company is unable to pay its debts on time. Hensel puts their current situation down to “unsatisfactory sales development” over recent months and the high costs of ongoing investment into developing new products.

According to the report on ProfiFoto, a provisional insolvency administrator has been appointed to help Hensel restructure the company in order to bring things back into the black. They say that in the meantime, Hensel’s business operations will run as usual during this restructuring process, which is currently being examined. The goal is to use the restructuring to help strengthen Hensel’s position and cash flow to thrive in the future.

The opening of the actual insolvency proceedings is scheduled for September 1st, 2019, only two months away. So, hopefully, they’ll have figured out a plan by then, otherwise, it may be an end to the company and another longstanding lighting heavyweight that’s wes founded in 1963, over fifty years ago.

Managing director, Guido Puttkammer is quoted to have said: “I am very confident that Hensel will continue to offer first-class products and will be available to all customers in the photographic and industrial sectors as a competent and reliable partner”.

We wish them well. Hensel is a very respected name in lighting, and it would be sad to see them go the way of Bowens and Multiblitz. Yes, I know Bowens is back, but it’s not really.

[via Profifoto]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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3 responses to “German lighting manufacturer Hensel goes into provisional insolvency”

  1. Marko Avatar
    Marko

    So Hensel is not as expensive as Profoto but still, not having battery power is a huge drawback for many strobe users. Hensel is known but the truth is, I have worked with a dozen photographers in the past 10 years and none carried Hensel (Profoto, Normans, Alien Bees but not Hensels)

    1. John Aguirre Avatar
      John Aguirre

      Not to sound like a vulture… but I just picked up 4 expert lighting heads and much more at a discount price. I’m shocked! This equipment is well made and produces fast fast recycling beautiful light! Before they restructure… buy buy buy! You will not be disappointed. I hope Hensel comes thru this restructure! I look forward to see their new equipment!!! Thanks

      1. Marko Avatar
        Marko

        The old stuff is made better no doubt. My friend used Normans that were made in the 80’s and they worked well until a couple of years ago. Their advantage was that they were simple. No computer, no sensors, just a few good solid components.

        Today’s strobes are way more sophisticated and complex and therefore will never be as reliable. Also, in order to compete and have larger profit, companies (regardless of price or brand) always cut corners. They count on today’s photographers to upgrade much more frequently.

        Companies like Godox give us quality and value that was never seen before. With all due respect to the known names, I would not purchase expensive strobes anymore.

        However, if you found a great find, good for you!! Three years ago I bought second hand Nikon 180mm f/2.8. It goes for $1,000 USD, I bought it for $300 CDN. Love it.

        We get lucky every now and then.