This $11,000 lens is exactly why you don’t check camera gear when flying

Aug 18, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This $11,000 lens is exactly why you don’t check camera gear when flying

Aug 18, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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It should be pretty common knowledge by now that you don’t check your delicate camera gear when flying. Ok, sometimes, you might no choice, especially if you fly Delta. But if the ability is there to carry it in your hand luggage, then do it. This was an expensive lesson to learn for one lady who recently brought her Leica M10 & 50mm f/0.95 Noctilux to Leica Store Manchester for repair.

The $10,995 lens has been smashed, and the $6,895 camera now won’t even turn on. Leica Store Manchester told PetaPixel, “She had only had the camera and lens for 2 weeks”.

Leica Store Manchester posted a photograph of the lens to Facebook and Instagram. Their goal is to warn others of the danger of putting expensive equipment in your checked luggage.

Here you can see that the two front lens elements have been completely smashed. Shockingly, the protective filter didn’t help one bit.

A very expensive lesson to learn, especially having only owned the equipment for two weeks.

It isn’t completely impossible to check your camera gear if you do it properly. For most travelling with cameras, though, it’s just impractical to even try. So, just carry it in your hand luggage.

If you really need to check it, make sure you get a good solid case designed and built for the task, like a Pelican Air. Don’t just rely on your standard off-the-shelf tourist suitcases.

[via PetaPixel]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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3 responses to “This $11,000 lens is exactly why you don’t check camera gear when flying”

  1. catlett Avatar
    catlett

    Old phrase in the US. Has more dollars than sense (intentionally not spelled cents).

  2. Hauke Fischer Avatar
    Hauke Fischer

    the main content in the case is : « recently brought to Leica Store Manchester by a woman who checked in a semi-firm camera case with this lens mounted to a Leica M10 »

    A semi-firm case.

    Absolutely no reason for panicking

  3. Garry A Staup Avatar
    Garry A Staup

    or know how to correct pack it… duh. I recently purchased an Argus late model camera case made of molded plastic and leather… on Etsy.com and the dummy overstuffed it into a way too small box and it arrived with two each 4″ or so cracks in it :(