TTArtisan releases new 11mm f/2.8 full-frame 180° fisheye lens for Nikon F and Canon EF mounts

Dec 2, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

TTArtisan releases new 11mm f/2.8 full-frame 180° fisheye lens for Nikon F and Canon EF mounts

Dec 2, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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TTArtisan has announced a new 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens for full-frame Nikon F mount and Canon EF mount DSLRs. Yeah, I know, a DSLR lens in 2022! What are they thinking? Well, it looks like might be bringing out some dedicated mirrorless versions, too, although so far, it only appears to be Nikon F and Canon EF mount ones that are available – although they can be easily adapted!

The new lens offers a wide 180° field of view with an also wide f/2.8 aperture. It has a built-in lens hood and a minimum focus distance of only 17 centimetres. It contains 12 elements in 10 groups, including 4 high refractive index elements to help control distortion and spherical aberrations for improved sharpness. An extra-low dispersion element helps to reduce colour fringing and chromatic aberration.

The lens features a dedicated aperture ring that ranges from f/2.8 to f/16. It’s a clicked aperture ring, which might upset some of the video guys, although you’re typically not moving from one extreme exposure to another with a fisheye lens, so it’s probably not going to be that big of a deal. Offering a wide 180° field of view, though, it opens up a few potential options for 180VR content with a pair of identical bodies and each utilising this lens.

When adapted to full-frame mirrorless bodies, and TTArtisan shows it being adapted to plenty in the images below, it’ll still offer that same 180° field of view. Used on APS-C bodies, unless it’s with some kind of speed booster that retains the field of view, it’s naturally going to be cropped down a little smaller. The product page for the TTArtisan 11mm f/2.8 Fisheye does show a bunch of different lens models, as well as lenses mounted to the cameras directly without adapters, although so far, only the Canon EF and Nikon F mount versions appear to be available.

TTArtisan does mention Sony E-Mount, Canon RF mount, Leica L mount, Fuji GFX and Leica M, so there should be a few versions on the way. Personally, given that it’s a manual focus fisheye lens, I’d be tempted to grab the Nikon F or Canon EF version and adapt it anyway, but maybe that’s just me. I shoot Nikon F mount DSLRs for stills and Panasonic MFT for video. So, the F mount version would work for me on both systems. For you, it might be a different story.

If you only shoot one camera system and aren’t intending to switch to something that uses a different mount in the future, then it may be better to hold off and wait for your mount version to appear – assuming it’s a mount that’s in the above list.

The TTArtisan is available to buy now for $235 in Nikon F mount and Canon EF mount versions. Shipping is expected to begin in the next couple of weeks.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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