This DIY YouTube studio-in-a-box lets you film anywhere instantly

May 12, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This DIY YouTube studio-in-a-box lets you film anywhere instantly

May 12, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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For some, the prospect of setting up a bunch of tripods, stands, equipment and wiring it all together is just too much of a pain to want to deal with when you want to shoot a 5-minute video. It’s what puts a lot of people off wanting to even try starting to make YouTube content. Or at least, it stops them posting as often.

But Caleb Pike has the solution. A full YouTube studio-in-a-box. Well, in a Pelican Case. He’s designed and built it to be a fully self-contained solution that you can just stick on your desk, open up and start filming. Or take on your travels and set up anywhere in an instant just by flipping the lid open.

The setup is based around a Pelican 1510 hard case. And he’s managed to mount everything without drilling a single hole in the case, so it still remains waterproof and you can turn it back into a regular case any time you please. In the bottom are dividers to hold power adapters, USB power banks, an LED light or two or whatever other bits you need. Everything that’s important is connected to the lid.

Three dual flash mount plates are screwed into pre-existing holes in the lid with M4 screws which is what everything mounts to. A small magic arm on the left for a field monitor, the camera (a Canon EOS M50 in this instance) in the middle with an Edelkrone FlexTILTball head, and three cold shoe mounts on the right to hold the Rode Wireless GO II receiver and a pair of transmitters.

I don’t think it’ll be all that practical for most vloggers, for whom it’s easier just to throw their camera on a Manfrotto PIXI and walk around holding it, but if you need a portable “studio” with a monitor that you can set up and pack away in an instant, it’s a very cool solution!

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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