This adapter lets you shoot medium format photos with a full-frame camera

May 21, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

This adapter lets you shoot medium format photos with a full-frame camera

May 21, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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You don’t need a medium format camera to shoot medium format photos anymore. Well, sort of. FotodioX RhinoCam Vertex adapter lets you shoot digital medium format photos with your full-frame camera. Mathieu Stern tried this $300 gadget, and it seems to do the trick pretty well.

YouTube video

First things first, how does the RhinoCam Vertex work? You’ll need your full-frame camera, a medium format lens, and Photoshop for stitching the images. The adapter lets you attach the medium format lens onto your camera and rotate it 360 degrees to take four photos.

Then, you need to stitch your photos in Photoshop (or any other software that lets you do it). The adapter works with Canon EOS R, Nikon Z, and Sony E mirrorless cameras, and Bronica ETR, Hasselblad V, and Pentax 645 medium format lenses.

YouTube video

Mathieu was curious how the adapter would work for portraits. He has used the “bokehrama” or the Brenizer method many times. However, its major downside is that it doesn’t do well with lenses that produce swirly bokeh. Additionally, Mathieu says that it’s easy to keep track of how many images you’ve taken for the “bokeh panorama,” so you’ll easily end up with too many.

The RhinoCam Vertex plays nicely even with swirly bokeh vintage lenses. You need to rotate the camera four times to take photos, and the adapter will click each time to let you know when to stop. When you stitch the photos together, you’ll end up with a 6×6 medium format image. In the video, Mathieu also shows you how to stitch them for the final result.

While this adapter seems like a handy gadget, there are some obvious downsides. A minor downside is you have to use a tripod to get the shots right. A more notable drawback is that it doesn’t work for all kinds of photos. If there’s movement in the scene, you’ll end up with some weird results. The same goes for fast-changing light with landscape shots. Still, it can work perfectly for genres like architecture, real estate, or cityscapes. And judging from Mathieu’s test, it can work great for portraits, too.

[How to shoot True Medium Format pictures with a Full-Frame Camera | Mathieu Stern]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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13 responses to “This adapter lets you shoot medium format photos with a full-frame camera”

  1. Dušan DuPe Pethö Avatar
    Dušan DuPe Pethö

    This can also be done with APSC I don’t need a canon…

    1. lejaune Avatar
      lejaune

      If you use the same adapter on a APSC, you’ll have gaps between frames, and not able to stitch them together.

  2. 3ric Johanson Avatar
    3ric Johanson

    For fast and easy stitching, use Microsoft ice!

  3. Josofa Tharris Avatar
    Josofa Tharris

    So take four photos with an adapter and stich them together. Heck no adapter and any camera + stitching software and you have any format camera you want if you buy into that logic. Best for landscapes and not portraits or anything with motion. Sigh…

  4. Alan Gauld Avatar
    Alan Gauld

    Isn’t this just the same as the pixel shift high Def mode found on some cameras? Olympus and Pentax for example. Not really medium format just higher pixel count.

    1. John Blood Avatar
      John Blood

      No, those are different than what this is. Imagine you have a cake but small plates. This cuts the cake up and puts slices onto the plates so you could later put the slices back together and remake the cake to look as though it was on a platter.

      What you are talking about is like cutting the same slice of a self healing cake multiple times and combining them into a single very detailed slice of cake.

      Something like a speed booster adapter would be more similar to this.

      1. Alan Gauld Avatar
        Alan Gauld

        Ok, so this is more like a multi dimensional panorama, say a 3×3 grid stitched together?

      2. Jeff Kingsley Avatar
        Jeff Kingsley

        Or just use a wider lens with super resolution mode.

  5. Mathieu Carbou Avatar
    Mathieu Carbou

    What’s the difference with simply taking several overlapping shots, stitching them together and even being able to achieve an even greater (large format) image ?

    1. Piotr Śpiewak Avatar
      Piotr Śpiewak

      It’s big difference for Rhino dealers

  6. Kevin McDonald Avatar
    Kevin McDonald

    I think everybody is sorta missing how this is different than simply creating a stitched pano using a dslr lens or using the sensor shift functionality. Since this is using a medium format lens you get the characteristics of that lens plus you’re recording the medium format image circle projected by that lens. That means the depth of field captured would be just like shooting medium format film. And to extend this, imagine a large format camera where you scan the projected image and record it in a similar manner. It would yield a digital image of the large format lens projection, including any movements. I don’t believe just taking a dslr + a dslr lens and scanning and panning to form a stitched pano would have the same image properties, except for resolution.

    1. Pierre Lagarde Avatar
      Pierre Lagarde

      Physically you’re right. Though, with good FF lenses, a standard post-production pano stitch work will give you results that are indistinguishable from shooting with a medium format lens.
      Most people that have good FF cameras and can afford MF lenses, can afford good enough FF lenses to have corners sharpness, colours and contrasts at a quality level far enough for the work to be done.
      With that, and the fact it would require lighter and simpler setup in the field for an equivalent process afterward, the reaction of some here looks quite understandable, to my sense.
      Though, the pleasure to use a MF lens with its specific render is always to be considered, indeed.

    2. Mathieu Carbou Avatar
      Mathieu Carbou

      What you are calling the “characteristics” of that lens is not retained at all since the sensor is smaller.
      This is the exactly like putting a full frame lense on an aps-c camera and move the lense around.
      The depth of field changes (and some other “characteristics” too).
      Whatever the number of photos are taken, stiched or whatever, the depth of field is a function of the lens and sensor. So to get the same characteristics of a lens A on medium format you would need to get another lens B on full frame to account for the sensor change or a speed booster.

      The only advantage I see in this gadget is that it takes advantage of the bigger lens diameter to limit the angle of view in order to provide an easier way to get 4 shots without risking moving the nodal point, which is something to pay attention to when doing pano shots.