The Types of People You Find in a NEW Photographer Facebook Group

Sep 26, 2014

Missy Mwac

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

The Types of People You Find in a NEW Photographer Facebook Group

Sep 26, 2014

Missy Mwac

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

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Lynn Cartia (AKA Missy Mwac) wrote this wonderful list and we are happy to share it with you.

The Expert: This is the photographer so eager to prove that they know all the things, that they jump into almost every thread with their advice. The advice is normally given with all the smoothness of sandpaper. The Expert is the end-all, be-all in his/her opinon and when questioned, will more than likely respond with, “You’re wrong. I’m pretty much always right.”

The Likeaholic: The photographer who will “like” any image uploaded to the Facebook group. Any. Image. It matters not what it looks like. Overexposed, underexposed, out of focus, processed to look like it was left in the back window of a car for 3 months…it doesn’t matter. Likeaholics will often “like” an image because no one else is and they feel sorry for it. They often engage in “Pity Likes.” If you look at an image and say, “How the heck could anyone “like” this?” you can bet it was liked by the Likeaholics.

The Contrarian: The Contrarian is looking for an argument. They feed on it, much like Godzilla monsters and radiation. If you say, “It’s really dark outside at midnight,” they will argue that it’s not dark outside everywhere and that a statement like that proves the ignorance of the person making the comment. The Contrarian is only happy when they are causing problems and even then, they aren’t happy. When unable to summon a logical response, they will normally end the conversation with that classic of comebacks: “You’re stupid.” They also go by the name of “troll.”

The Peacekeeper: The photographer who swoops into a heated thread and says, “Everyone needs to calm down.” Quite often, this advice backfires on the Peacekeeper, as it is often seen as a reprimand and being told to “calm down” is the equivalent of throwing gasoline on a fire.

The Lurker: The Lurkers rarely, if ever, post in a group. They normally content themselves with lurking in the shadows, watching the action. They often turn their “notifications” off, but will wander into the groups when they are bored or are waiting for their Netflix selection to load while editing.

The Post-a-lots: The names of these photographers are easily recognizable, because they post their images at least 3-4x a week. They will show you a color image, and then that same image in black and white later in the day to get the group’s opinion as to which they think is best. They will then crop it differently and post it yet again.

The Disclaimer Critique Seeker: These group members will post to Facebook groups looking for a critique of their work, but only if it’s a nice critique with not much critique. They look for words like, “This is awesome!” and “Beautiful!” and are best friends with the Likeaholics. If someone gives less than positive feedback, the Disclaimer Critique Seekers will quickly remind the group that they are still new at this, despite being open for business.

The Not Really Newbie: The Not Really Newbie delights in posting to newbie groups. A more accomplished photographer, the Not Really Newbie will post a beautiful image to a newbie group knowing it will receive much praise and adoration from the group. The Not Really Newbie counts on this.

The Stroke My Ego: Same as The Not Really Newbie, however, the Stroke My Ego posts beautiful images and takes it a step further by asking for critiques. The Stroke My Ego will receive a long thread of replies such as, “This is perfect” and “I wouldn’t change a thing,” which is the reason the Stroke My Ego posts in the first place.

The “Buy My Workshop”- The Buy-My-Workshop was an Expert who took it to the next logical level. He/she, although very new to the photography business with no track record or experience beyond a couple years…or months, wastes no time in informing the other members that “in response to overwhelming requests, they are considering putting on a workshop.” The Buy-My-Workshop will then go on to appear on creativeLive.

About The Author

Lynn Cartia (AKA Missy Mwac) is a photographer/eater of bacon/drinker of vodka and a guide through the murky waters of professional photography. You can follow her social media links here: Facebook, Tumblr. This article was originally published here and shared with permission.

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We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

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5 responses to “The Types of People You Find in a NEW Photographer Facebook Group”

  1. Chris Hoffmann Avatar
    Chris Hoffmann

    Nice to see an actual author of an article given credit for her work!

  2. ianspiers Avatar
    ianspiers

    Mad props to Missy M. and kudos to DIYphotography!

  3. kevin Avatar
    kevin

    You forgot one more type.. The Copier… the type that joins new groups and copies every aspect of other people’s works, and claim them as their own..

  4. Jizelle Avatar
    Jizelle

    “The Disclaimer Critique Seekers will quickly remind the group that they are still new at this, despite being open for business.” My chin is constantly dropping at the amount of poor quality images (watermarked through the middle in case someone would steal them) hitting social media and being heralded as “amazing….when can i hire you?” (for terrible images), only to hear they actually did hire them over a ‘real photographer’ and then come crawling to the ‘real photographer’ shocked that said previous amazing photographer couldn’t take one clear nice photo at the event/party. Then after complaining at the money wasted, ask the ‘real photographer’ to fix them up for free, or do the next event/party for free with photo credit to build your business (They have thousands of ‘friends’). Unfortunately there are a lot of people that get addicted to certain things, including the social media culture. It is a little like gambling at the pokies for some peple, where the music has been designed to lure them in and feel like they are having a good time losing their life savings. In facebook land, it is where people can advertise they are a photographer open for business and take jobs away from the professionals, unable to produce anything useable or likeable in any lighting conditions. And worse still, if the photos are posted on facebook and are full of crooked horizons, poorly exposed, blurry of anything moving faster than a turtle, full of clutter and background chromatic aberration, blown out white skies and panda eyes, and they still get countless likes and further business. Honestly, people need to wake up to themselves.

  5. Joseph Bernado Avatar
    Joseph Bernado

    You left out your type which is a classic example of the grass is always browner on the other side of the hill.