Snoop Dogg proclaims “m********ing photographers” shouldn’t own celebrity photos they take

Mar 10, 2022

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Snoop Dogg proclaims “m********ing photographers” shouldn’t own celebrity photos they take

Mar 10, 2022

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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There are some celebrities who think that photos of them belong to them and that they can use them however they want. As you know, this isn’t the case. So, many celebrities also got sued by photographers after posting their photos without permission.

Rapper Nas has recently joined the club after a photographer sued him for sharing his photo. And it got his colleague Snoop Dogg so mad that he posted a video claiming that *beeeep* photographers shouldn’t own their own photos.

But let us start from the beginning. As Radar reports, photographer Al Pereira is suing Nas in federal court over a photo of him and late rapper 2Pac. Pereira took the photo back in 1993, and registered it for copyright in 2017, according to this source. Then, as the photographer claims, Nas posted this photo to his Instagram in 2020. You guessed it: without licensing it or asking for permission.

The photographer accuses Nas of profiting from his work but also using it to increase his social media stats, according to Radar. Considering that Pereira makes money from licensing his work, the rapper using his photo made him “furious.”

You’re probably not surprised that not everyone’s on the photographer’s side. After all, we’ve already seen some celebrities thinking that they contribute to the photos, so using them on social media constitutes fair use. Snoop Dogg is in this group as well, and he recently expressed it in a video on Instagram. Only he wasn’t as nice as Gigi Hadid (who also was sued for the same thing as Nas, by the way). You can Snoop’s elaboration in the video below, but be warned: if you don’t want your children to learn seven new cuss words, now’s the time to get them out of the room.

If you take someone’s photo, that photo isn’t yours. “It’s a mere likeness-type situation, you’re borrowing my likeness,” the rapper notes between a flood of swear words. He claims that there needs to be a law to protect artists because there are a bunch of “mother****ers” out there selling photos with his face in them and he doesn’t earn anything from it. I wonder, though, if he should get the same treatment when he samples other people’s songs into his own.

I must say I agree that, in some cases, it’s the celebrities who make photos of them sellable. When paparazzi take photos, they’re usually low-quality in terms of artistic value. The only thing that makes someone want to buy them is that they depict famous people. Still, this doesn’t mean that the photographers who took them don’t own them. Plus, in this particular case: Al Pereira is not a paparazzo. So, dear Snoop, the law that protects artists already exists: it’s called the copyright law and it will most likely be on Pereira’s side.

[via PetaPixel, Radar; image credits: Jason Persse, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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9 responses to “Snoop Dogg proclaims “m********ing photographers” shouldn’t own celebrity photos they take”

  1. Chris Cameron Avatar
    Chris Cameron

    So if Snoop dog writes a song about someone without their permission. The song belongs to them?

  2. Rhayven Jones Avatar
    Rhayven Jones

    There is actually a law that protects celebs in situations like this that many celebs don’t know about. It’s called “Right of Publicity”. It protects their image/likeness (i.e their voice, face, etc.) from commercial usage. It doesn’t apply in every situation, but some have used it successfully.

    1. Arthur_P_Dent Avatar
      Arthur_P_Dent

      Commercial usage only applies to using it as part of an advertisement. Editorial uses are still fair game.

      1. Rhayven Jones Avatar
        Rhayven Jones

        Indeed, which makes this particular situation with Nas all the more interesting. The post Nas made can fall under editorial usage as it wasn’t being used to advertise or promote anything. Al knows this which is why he is trying to claim Nas was using the image to bolster his social media following. But like all claims, he would have to provide evidence of that which at least on the surface does not exist.

        1. Arthur_P_Dent Avatar
          Arthur_P_Dent

          But Nas doesn’t own the copyright for the photo. He cannot use it without permission from the photographer and proper licensing for the image. That’s Copyright 101.

        2. Kaouthia Avatar
          Kaouthia

          Editorial use doesn’t negate copyright. The Right of Publicity is a completely different thing.

  3. Jared Polin Avatar
    Jared Polin

    You tried to take a shot at Snoop with the “samples” snipe, you’re wrong, they pay for the samples. Back in the day they used them, and that entire situation evolved in the same was as the photos should. They give percentages of ownership to who they sample.

  4. Aaron Avatar
    Aaron

    I’m with Snoop. It’s stupid that you can take a picture of someone without their permission, and make money on it. Not only that, claim it as your own and even sue the person in the photo for using it? Ridiculous. That’s like recording a song at a concert of music that you had nothing to do with, and claim that audio as your property.

  5. Daniel D. Teoli Jr Avatar
    Daniel D. Teoli Jr

    All this discussion just underscores…you go by the law. Snoop can wish all he likes, but it is not the law (As yet)

    I had read in Europe they have laws against using candid street photos online without permission. Don’t know if it is true or how far it is enforced. But it may come to the USA someday. Just no telling what laws we will get down the road.

    If it ever comes to that, just block out their faces…and keep pressing the button!