Satlapse Uses High Flying Drones For Bird’s Eye Timelapses

Sep 3, 2015

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

Sep 3, 2015

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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Here is something we have not seen drone’s do yet. A timelapse. Photographer Jamie Brightmore used a “GPS enhanced” DJI Phantom 2 to put a GoPro Hero 4 at a constant position in the sky and take timelapse sequences from a constant position. He calls this project SATLAPSE. While this is an experimental project, he results are quite interesting.

There is an inherent advantage to shooting timelapses vs. expediting video footage, the main one is the ability to use long shutter speeds, or even add an ND filter and gain long exposure on sunny days.

Jamie shares a short explanation on the technique:

Why is it called Sat­lapse? Using wide angle cam­eras, facing down, at 350-400ft in the air cre­ates shots that look like satel­lite images. A coin­cid­ental nicety; in order for a small remotely piloted air­craft sys­tem (RPAS) to main­tain a stable hover, it uses dir­ect com­mu­nic­a­tion with satel­lites in Earth’s orbit (GPS).

So what’s dif­fer­ent about this tech­nique? Firstly, the shots are com­pletely static with any sign of sta­bil­isa­tion elim­in­ated as much as pos­sible. No mean feat con­sid­er­ing the fact it’s all shot using a small RPAS hov­er­ing in one spot for sev­eral minutes! Secondly, this is true timelapse, in that you are tak­ing frame-by-frame images as opposed to speed­ing up video foot­age. This allows the shut­ter to be dragged using ND fil­ters as is prac­ticed in reg­u­lar timelapse work

Jamie also advises to make sure you are flying at a safe (and privacy friendly) height and at a location that will pose no danger:

satlapse-01

Here is the question, when will we have a battery technology efficient enough that a viewpoint like this would sustain in air for more than a few minutes. Maybe a device like Fotokite is the obvious solution here.

[SATLAPSE – Aerial Timelapse Cinematography | Jamie Brightmore via SATLAPSE ]

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Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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6 responses to “Satlapse Uses High Flying Drones For Bird’s Eye Timelapses”

  1. Eric Jaakkola Avatar
    Eric Jaakkola

    I’ve done it. Though only proof of concept quality.

    1. Gravy Avatar
      Gravy

      Not even close. You are welcome for the view

  2. Mavie Avatar
    Mavie

    Why people use Vimeo? 10 minutes buffering 1 minute video…

    1. Jamie Brightmore Avatar
      Jamie Brightmore

      Here’s the YouTube upload: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4zXI6lqbpQ

  3. Eran Avatar
    Eran

    NICE!