This New York City day-to-night panorama took 4 hours to shoot

Sep 12, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This New York City day-to-night panorama took 4 hours to shoot

Sep 12, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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It took Mexico based photographer Felix Hernández five years and several trips to New York City to be able to get this shot. Not being from the USA, NYC isn’t a place that Felix gets to visit very often. It took him several trips just to find the right spot from which to shoot. But when he finally did, was able to make this wonderful day to night panorama transition.

Felix tells DIYP that NYC PULSE, From Day to Night is the most expensive, time consuming, RAM consuming, health risking image he’s ever made. He says that it was -6°C 21°F) that day.

Standing there for at least four hours, Felix shot away with his trusty Canon 5D Mark II and 105mm lens. Between 4-8pm, he created 20 individual images through the duration, before heading off to warm back up. The photographs were merged into a single image in post, printable up to 10ft (3m) wide at 150PPI. On the full size image, Felix says you can even just make out some of the cars on the streets.

Panoramic shots that show the progression of time always fascinate me. They shouldn’t be possible, and before the days of digital photography and Photoshop, they pretty much weren’t possible. Or at the very least, so time and cost prohibitive that it wasn’t practical to even try.

You can see more of Felix’s work over on the Hernandez Dreamphography website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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4 responses to “This New York City day-to-night panorama took 4 hours to shoot”

  1. We Love Our Labrador Retriever Avatar
    We Love Our Labrador Retriever

    Thanks big Photography fan here

  2. Rob Blaich Avatar
    Rob Blaich

    “health risking image he’s ever made. He says that it was -6°C 21°F) that day.”

    I’m going to sound very Canadian, but I snickered a bit at this comment, since I’ve taken a panoramic of my city on top of a building, while it was around -20C. Winter shots are just another common thing around these parts.

    Wonderful image though and major kudos to the photographer!

    1. Jairo Sandoval Navarro Avatar
      Jairo Sandoval Navarro

      he comes from Cancun the Mexican Caribbean so you’ll understand he is not used to that kind of weather

    2. Rick Avatar
      Rick

      The warmest clothing he probably owns is a fleece hoodie. I’d venture to bet he had layered on every article of clothing he’d packed in his suitcase for this shoot.