Canon APS-C RF mount camera expected in 2022, new camera registrations, is EOS-M disappearing?

Sep 28, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Canon APS-C RF mount camera expected in 2022, new camera registrations, is EOS-M disappearing?

Sep 28, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Well, a couple of things coming out of the Canon camp today. First up, Nokishita has spotted two new camera registrations from Canon coming from what appears to be a Russian certification body. The two bodies are unreleased cameras with the codes DS126841 and DS126842. The other is an update on the long-awaited APS-C RF mount mirrorless camera.

The timing of these two seemingly independent bits of info seems quite convenient and I think they may be linked. I also think this could spell the end for Canon’s EOS-M system. I don’t think it’ll happen overnight, but if an APS-C RF mount body is on the way, what’s the point of keeping the second mount system around?

The registration screenshot posted by Nokishita also mentions DS126801 – which was actually registered a couple of years ago with the FCC and turned out to be the Canon EOS 90D APS-C DSLR. The two new codes, DS126841 and DS126842 are currently unreleased cameras that are definitely not the new Canon EOS R3 (which is DS126835, DS126855, DS126856, DS126857, DS126858 and DS126859).

https://twitter.com/nokishita_c/status/1442610061763747848

Whether or not these codes are related to an update posted by Canon Rumors remains to be seen, but they say they’ve received word from a reliable source that “Canon will definitely be bringing an APS-C RF mount camera” in the latter half of 2022. And best of all, it’ll have a backside-illuminated (BSI) sensor.

CR believes that this sensor will appear in more than one camera, so it’s quite possible that DS126841 and DS126842 are both APS-C RF mount mirrorless cameras that will both contain the same new BSI sensor. Exactly what the resolution will be is unknown, but CR guesses that it’ll be in the 28-32 megapixel range.

If the rumours are true, and these codes are a couple of upcoming APS-C RF mount cameras, we might finally be seeing a real successor to the Canon 7D Mark II DSLR – a product line that Canon appeared to abandon in 2019. The 7D Mark III was released in September 2014 and there is currently nothing filling that gap in Canon’s lineup in either RF or EF-M mounts. So, a crop flagship body (EOS R7, anyone?) is long overdue.

I expect the delay in releasing a 7D Mark II successor has largely been down to Canon waiting to see if the whole RF mirrorless thing took off before deciding whether or not to go the ASP-C route with the new mount or just make the 7D Mark II replacement an EF-M body. I suspect that Canon might have already fully developed at least one EF-M mount 7D Mark II replacement but with everybody jumping onto the RF mount bandwagon, they probably deemed it not worth the hassle of going to actual release.

As for the second camera… Well, the Canon EOS 90D was released in September 2019 and the Canon EOS 80D was released before it in March 2016. So, late 2022 would put a potential mirrorless replacement for that product line on about the right three-year-ish schedule.

If Canon is “definitely” starting production of APS-C RF mount cameras next year, though, then it seems the Canon EOS-M system’s future is very much in doubt.

[via Nokishita / Canon Rumors]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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5 responses to “Canon APS-C RF mount camera expected in 2022, new camera registrations, is EOS-M disappearing?”

  1. Mueller Avatar
    Mueller

    Better have IBIS

  2. Francis85 Avatar
    Francis85

    Was to be expected – EOS M is a BIG fail in Europe and never got real traction.
    I understand its different in the far east, but here its a really bad seller.

    1. KP Avatar
      KP

      Yes, that’s all I have heard — that the M line is huge in Japan, Canon’s home turf, but almost unseen in the U.S. (compared to all the other APS-C and compact cameras). Canon needs to just walk away from the M line and focus those resources on the R(F) platform.

      1. Jukeboxjohnnie Avatar
        Jukeboxjohnnie

        Why? Ive got a M6ii its 32mp and brilliant, the lenses are tiny and the camera is small. Any RF sucessor is going to be bigger for no good reason

        1. Wellington Avatar
          Wellington

          I agree. It’s honestly the most fun I’ve ever had with a camera. In addition to Canon’s M series lenses, the three sigma primes are superb, and an inexpensive EF-EFM adaptor flawlessly fills in any gaps (e.g. in the 400-600 zoom range).