Canon finally makes APS-C RF mount official with the new EOS R7 and EOS R10 mirrorless cameras

May 24, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Canon finally makes APS-C RF mount official with the new EOS R7 and EOS R10 mirrorless cameras

May 24, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

In the words of the late, great Freddie Mercury… “It finally happened, happened, happened… It fiiiiinally happened!”. Yup, Canon has now officially gone APS-C with their RF mount mirrorless system with the announcement of not one but two new APS-C RF mount mirrorless cameras with the Canon EOS R7 and EOS R10. If this doesn’t mark the end of EOS M (even though Canon apparently denies it), then I don’t know what does.

The Canon EOS R7 is a 32.5-megapixel RF mirrorless camera, with up to 30 frames per second continuous shooting and full-sensor width 4K video at up to 60fps (a first for Canon APS-C!) and up to an insane 8-stops of hybrid lens/in-body image stabilisation. The EOS R10 is a lower-priced 24-megapixel APS-C body with no IBIS but inherits the AI autofocus system from the EOS R3.

YouTube video

Canon EOS R7 – $1,499

The Canon EOS R7 is the long-awaited mirrorless replacement for the Canon EOS 7D Mark II and it actually boasts a feature set to be a true replacement. It contains a 32.5-megapixel CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel CMOS AF II focusing, 4K video at up to 60 frames per second using the full width of the sensor, 15fps continuous shooting with the mechanical shutter or 30fps with the electronic shutter. There is no wonder this camera made it to our top Canon cameras guide.

It inherits the Digic X image processor from the EOS R3, along with its Dual Pixel CMOS AF II system with phase detection subject detection and tracking and the ability to recognise people, animals and vehicles. It also features an in-body image stabilisation system that can correct up to 5 stops of camera shake using non-stabilised lenses. Used in conjunction with Canon’s IS lenses, you can get up to an extremely impressive 8 stops of shake reduction.

Sensor32.5-megapixel APS-C CMOS
Lens MountCanon RF
Max resolution32.5-megapixels
File formatRAW, JPG, HEIF
Bit-depth14-Bit
ISO 100-32,000 (ext 100-51,200)
Stabilisation5-axis in-body image stabilisation sensor-shift (up to 8 stops in combination with IS lenses)
Continuous shooting15fps (mechanical) / 30fps mechanical
4K VideoFull-width 4K UHD UHD (3840 x 2160) at up to 59.94fps / 4:2:2 10-Bit
HD VideoFull HD (1920×1080) at up to 119.88p
Focus typeDual Pixel CMOS AF II
AF Points651 phase detection
Viewfinder2.36m-dot EVF
LCD3.0″ 1.62m-dot Articulating Touchscreen LCD
Card slotsDual: UHS-II SD
ConnectivityWiFi, Bluetooth, USB 3.1, Micro HDMI, 3.5mm headphone, 3.5mm microphone
Dimensions132 x 90.4 x 91.7mm
Weight612g (with battery and memory)
Launch price$1,499

One surprise is that it features dual UHS-II SD card slots, shunning the trend of mixing up an SD card slot with a CFexpress slot. This will be a welcome decision for many Canon shooters who don’t want to have to go to the hassle and expense of buying CFexpress cards just to be able to shoot to two cards simultaneously and have backups as they go. It also has the flippy out LCD, which many users will love, although some will hate.

The Canon EOS R7 is available to pre-order now for $1,499 and will ship in late 2022 (Canon hasn’t been more specific about a release date than that yet).

Canon EOS R10 – $979.99

The Canon EOS R10 is essentially the replacement for Canon’s Digital Rebel series of cameras, along with the EOS M50 Mark II – although Canon says neither of these has officially been discontinued just yet. It lacks some of the advanced features of the Canon EOS R10, like the sensor-shift IBIS system, but it does retain the Digic X processor and Dual Pixel CMOS AF II system from the EOS R3.

It also shoots 4K video up to a maximum of 60 frames per second, however, you’ll only get the full width of the sensor at up to 30fps. At 60fps, it has a 1.56x crop (on top of the 1.6x crop of the sensor vs full-frame for about a 2.5x crop total). That 4K 60fps crop is great if you want to get a bit more reach on your long lenses for sports or wildlife, but not so much if you want to use it for vlogging. You’d need a 10mm lens just to get the equivalent field of view to a 25mm on full-frame.

Sensor24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS
Lens MountCanon RF
Max resolution24.2-megapixels
File formatRAW, JPG, HEIF
Bit-depth14-Bit
ISO 100-32,000 (ext 100-51,200)
StabilisationNone
Continuous shooting15fps (mechanical) / 23fps mechanical
4K VideoFull-width 4K UHD UHD (3840 x 2160) at up to 29.97fps / 4:2:2 10-Bit
Cropped 4K UHD UHD (3840 x 2160) at 59.94fps / 4:2:2 10-Bit
HD VideoFull HD (1920×1080) at up to 119.88p
Focus typeDual Pixel CMOS AF II
AF Points651 phase detection
Viewfinder2.36m-dot EVF
LCD3.0″ 1.04m-dot Articulating Touchscreen LCD
Card slotsSingle UHS-II SD
ConnectivityWiFi, Bluetooth, USB 2.0 (Type-C), Micro HDMI, 3.5mm microphone
Dimensions122.5 x 87.8 x 83.4mm
Weight429.2g (with battery and memory)
Launch price$1,499

The EOS R10 looks quite decent, although I have to admit, with the lack of IBIS and the very heavy crop that makes it even tighter than Micro Four Thirds when shooting 4K 60fps, I think that for serious enthusiasts, it’s probably worth skipping this one and just going straight up to the EOS R7 above. If 4K 60fps video isn’t important to you, though, and you’ve got stabilised lenses or you’re always shooting with flash or in super bright conditions, then the EOS R10 could be a great option.

The Canon EOS R10 is available to pre-order now for $979.99 and will also ship in late 2022.

To go along with the new cameras, Canon has also announced two new lenses, the RF-S 18-45mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM and the RF-S 18-150mm f/3.5-6.3 IS STM lenses which will be the standard zoom lenses for the EOS R7 and EOS R10 respectively. The 18-45mm will offer a filed of view equivalent to that of a 29-72mm lens on full-frame, while the 18-150mm would be equivalent to 29-240mm coverage on full-frame. Canon says that while these lenses are obviously optimised for APS-C sensor bodies with a smaller image circle, they can be used with any R series camera. These will also be available in late 2022.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *