This app calculates portion size and calories using your smartphone camera

Jun 29, 2023

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

This app calculates portion size and calories using your smartphone camera

Jun 29, 2023

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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This app calculates portion size and calories using your smartphone camera

A new app promises to accurately calculate the calorific content of your food just by snapping a photo on your smartphone. SnapCalorie does exactly what it sounds like: it uses AI (naturally) and other algorithms to analyse what’s on your plate and the amount of energy it contains.

Not only can it figure out calories, but it also uses your phone’s depth sensor to advise you on the correct portion size. It could be very useful for anybody on a controlled diet to help them stay on track.

The app is a collaboration between Google Lens founder Wade Norris and Scott Baron, a systems engineer in the aerospace industry. Norris apparently wanted to positively impact people’s lives.

Image credit: SnapCalorie

“Human beings are terrible at visually estimating the portion size of a plate of food,” Norris told TechCrunch. “SnapCalorie improves on the status quo by combining a variety of new technologies and algorithms.”

According to TechCrunch, the app was trained on 5000 different meals. It is reported to be 80% more accurate than other similar calorie-counting apps because of the use of depth sensors.

However, the development team couldn’t rely on simply sampling existing photos of food and having humans label them after the fact because of the large amount of human error in estimating portion size. So the team had to train the data set on thousands of carefully created and measured images of each different meal and type of food.

The app is quickly gaining popularity, with a thousand new downloads just this month. It is free from the Apple and Google Play stores, although a premium subscription of $29 a month exists to unlock more features.

[Via TechCrunch]

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Alex Baker

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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5 responses to “This app calculates portion size and calories using your smartphone camera”

  1. Al D Avatar
    Al D

    You need to pay to use the camera portion of the app

    1. Burt Johnson Avatar
      Burt Johnson

      Not just “pay,” but $29 per month. VERY high cost for a gadget that I doubt works very well…

  2. Burt Johnson Avatar
    Burt Johnson

    $29/month to use the camera??? And no way to get a free trial without first giving payment info that will start charging unless you go through their Byzantine system to cancel.

    No thanks. I would TRY it for free (no registration), and maybe pay if it worked (which I doubt), but I will not pay-to-try…

    1. Dapps Studio Avatar
      Dapps Studio

      that’s a good point, you could use Snappetite app instead (https://apple.co/43ns3NZ), the app is free and has more features.

  3. Matthias Proske Avatar
    Matthias Proske

    Huawei introduced that like… 5 or more years ago, so nothing new. The main problem still remains: It is almost impossible to judge the calories, if the camera can’t see all layers.

    Imagine a delicious Ramen: Depending on how deep the bowl is, the amount of liquid and ramen noodles in there can differ a lot. Cheesecake can be made in many different ways, especially the amount of fat. Some use flower, others don’t etc. The same sized piece of cake could have double or half calories, depending on the recipe.

    tl;dr: Useless