Test shows that Rolling shutter on the 5D Mark IV is a pretty big issue with 4K

Aug 30, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Test shows that Rolling shutter on the 5D Mark IV is a pretty big issue with 4K

Aug 30, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

5d_mark_iv_rolling_shutter

The folks over at DPReview have got their hands on a 5D Mark IV. One of the tests they’ve performed with respect to video is how well it handles movement. Rolling shutter artifacts are just a fact of life with CMOS sensors. These types of sensor capture a scene line by line. They do it very quickly, although not quickly enough to prevent things from appearing to lean or just looking plain weird.

CMOS sensors have improved on the rolling shutter issues over the last few years. Canon’s new 5D Mark IV, however, doesn’t really seem to be that great at all. It’s certainly not as good as many were hoping for, especially if shooting 4K.

YouTube video

In the video, the 5D Mark IV is shown alongside the EOS 1D X Mark II. They also put it up against the Sony A6300.  In each test, they had both cameras connected to an arm simultaneously to ensure they both moved at the same speed.

At every framerate, the 5D Mark IV shows quite a substantial amount more “lean” due to rolling shutter than the 1D X Mark II. If your filming is largely static, then it might not be much of an issue. If you want to include any kind of pan, or have subjects moving across the frame, this may not be the ideal camera for you. Even slow pans showed buildings to be vertical on the 1D X Mark II yet showed significant lean on the 5D Mark IV.

5d_mark_iv_rolling_shutter_2997

When put up against the A6300, though, the results are a little more interesting. Framerate changes don’t seem to make much difference to the 5D Mark IV. Regardless of what you shoot at. At 23.98fps, the amount of lean appears to be the same. Bumping things up to 29.98fps, the A6300 shows a slight improvement (similar to the 1D X Mark II), where the 5D Mark IV does not.

5d_mark_iv_rolling_shutter_2998_sony

They do say that the issue is not so much of a problem when shooting 1080p. They suggest that when shooting fast action or when camera movements are required, that you drop the resolution. Although, that does kind of defeat the purpose of shooting a camera which records 4K.

Between this, the crop factor, and that it does not allow for a clean 4K output to an external recorder, the 5D Mark IV is turning out to not quite be the video beast many were hoping for. But, we’ll see how it is in the real world once it becomes available and in the hands of filmmakers.

You can see sample screen grabs and further analysis over on DPReview.

Has the 5D Mark IV news coming out disappointed you? Or are you optimistic that it’s not as bad as some reports make it appear? Are you going to get one? Will you get something else instead now? Or will you stick with your 5D Mark III for a little while longer? Let us know in the comments.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 responses to “Test shows that Rolling shutter on the 5D Mark IV is a pretty big issue with 4K”

  1. Rick Scheibner Avatar
    Rick Scheibner

    I’m still shooting my 5DmkII. I’ll probably pick up a mkIV when the mkV is announced and they’re on closeout.

  2. Kay O. Sweaver Avatar
    Kay O. Sweaver

    Not worth the upgrade for me. Might pick up a cheap mkIII in a few months though. Though to be honest the 80D might even be the better video camera in the Canon line right now. Really though I’m waiting to see if an A7SIII might be on the horizon.

  3. Pete Avatar
    Pete

    I have yet to see any 4k camera out there besides $10k plus dedicated video cameras that don’t have rolling shutter, so this is kind of a non issue.