Pilot arrested after crashing his drone into a World Trade Center complex skyscraper

Aug 4, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Pilot arrested after crashing his drone into a World Trade Center complex skyscraper

Aug 4, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

A Texas tourist recently learned the hard way that you can’t fly a drone just anywhere. He crashed his DJI Air 2S into a skyscraper in New York City’s World Trade Center complex. It caused an immediate response from authorities, resulting in an arrest.

The incident took place this Monday around 3 pm. Adam Ismail (22) was trying to make “a personal travel video for his Instagram followers,” as he told the New York Daily News. According to the same source, he launched his drone about eight stories into the air, when it crashed into a skyscraper at 7 World Trade Center.

Ismail was taken to custody and the police confiscated his drone. They later issued him a summons for violating the city code preventing personal drone use. He was released from custody, but his drone remains confiscated. He claimed that he had no idea that the building was a part of the World Trade Center, and that the September 11 terrorist attacks didn’t cross his mind. I’ll take a wild guess that he was living under a rock for the past 20 years.

“I learned today you can’t fly a drone anywhere in New York City,” Ismail told the New York Daily News. He learned it the hard way, but it’s true – it’s very difficult to legally fly a drone in NYC. Documentary filmmaker Griffin Hammond gave us four main reasons for it, claiming that it’s nearly impossible to fly a drone in NYC. So, as always, I suggest doing your homework before you start shooting that aerial video.

[via DPReview]

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

6 responses to “Pilot arrested after crashing his drone into a World Trade Center complex skyscraper”

  1. Craig Johnson Avatar
    Craig Johnson

    Do your homework? Think learning to fly it first would be more appropriate….

    1. Carl Goodwin Avatar
      Carl Goodwin

      Craig Johnson using the word ‘pilot’ in that title is stretching it a bit, idiot has nearly the same letters.

  2. John Wojciechowski Avatar
    John Wojciechowski

    People like that make it hard on others who are responsible and obey the rules and law.

    1. Craig Johnson Avatar
      Craig Johnson

      John Wojciechowski It would be a piss poor risk assessment deciding to fly a drone around tower blocks in a built up city environment. Theres lots of things to factor in from poor reception competing with a multitude of WiFi signals to wind sheer(turbulent airflow around the buildings themselves.

  3. Nicholas Kau Avatar
    Nicholas Kau

    So many people post illegal drone videos. Close to airports, over metro areas, over large crowds Over 200m in altitude. They already know the rules. They just don’t care.

  4. Schuyler Grace Avatar
    Schuyler Grace

    I wonder if he had a Part 107 certificate or a waiver to fly over people or one from the new TRUST certifications or FAA registration of his craft or clearance to fly in restricted airspace. I’m guessing no to most, if not all of the above. These things are fun to fly, but there are rules about when, where, how, and by whom. And he picked one of the worst places he could. As someone said a long time ago, common sense ain’t so common anymore.