Is Nikon Hiding D800 Recall As ‘Free Maintenance’ Initiative?

Jul 14, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Is Nikon Hiding D800 Recall As ‘Free Maintenance’ Initiative?

Jul 14, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

nikon-d800-recall

In today’s world, everyone likes to dress up words and make them sound more appealing to themselves and the masses.  Political correctness is rampant, and we have to be so careful anymore about what we say so as to not offend the sensibilities of others or cast something in a negative light.

Yesterday, various Nikon D800 owners received emails informing them of a free “Nikon Maintenance Service Initiative.”  It’s not clear yet whether Nikon is simply being generous, testing equipment for potential persistent issues, or if this is another name for a recall.

Forum poster “Der Steppenwolf” was kind enough to share a copy of the joyous announcement with the world:

Nikon-D800-free-maintenance-recall

And, the accompanying maintenance certificate:

Nikon-D800-free-maintenance-recall-2

 

Again, it’s unclear what Nikon’s motives are, but in a competitive world where issuing a formal recall could mean a dip in sales and a hit to stockholders, I can imagine they’d be scrambling to find a way to dress it up.  Some are speculating that the initiative may have something to do with the left focusing issue on the camera.  …or, perhaps they inadvertently built in nuclear launch codes to the firmware.

Then again, maybe Nikon is just taking the high road and doing their best to maintain happy customers.  However, the chances of that are similar to those of me winning a beauty pageant…

[via Nikon Rumors]

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 responses to “Is Nikon Hiding D800 Recall As ‘Free Maintenance’ Initiative?”

  1. gregorylent Avatar
    gregorylent

    mine seems to have a built in backfocus

  2. Kelly Bonds Avatar
    Kelly Bonds

    Keep lying, Nikon about your QC problems and we are going to lose all confidence in you.

    1. Nick Edges Avatar
      Nick Edges

      I think most people have lost all confidence and just hoping they will see the light and really start listening to their consumers.

  3. John Havord Avatar
    John Havord

    Seems they have now included the D700.

  4. Hidenao Ben Nakagawa Avatar
    Hidenao Ben Nakagawa

    looks like D700,too. Is this US only?

  5. Ray Deakin Avatar
    Ray Deakin

    6 years continual use and not a hint of trouble……..oh wait. I have a Canon

  6. JimmyD Avatar
    JimmyD

    That quite pathetic. Nikon continues to makes a fool of themself. Every enthusiast photographer, and almost all Nikon users in this world knew what the problem was-is, but Nikon continues to hide around a straw. No wonder that they lost a lot in market share in the last year.
    Look at Pentax. They have a problem with the new released K-3II, and in less than 50 days from the launch they recognise it, and they release an announcement that a big part of the cameras that was already sold must be send back to fix the problem. That is how things can be solved, and face can be saved (at least at the trust level, which is the most important).
    Maybe someone can tell to Nikon that we are living in the internet era. Not in the feudal middle age.