How wedding photographers and videographers can stop grabbing each other by the throat

Feb 16, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

How wedding photographers and videographers can stop grabbing each other by the throat

Feb 16, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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There’s hardly a wedding without a photographer and a videographer. If these two are not from the same studio, there may be some disagreements, tension, and pressure. They both aim at getting the perfect shot or footage, and it’s important that they work together, and not against each other. In this video from Adorama TV, Vanessa Joy and Robbie Canter will tell you more about the ways for wedding photographers and videographers to work together and make great photos and videos.

YouTube video

Play like a team

The first and the foremost is that you need to be a team rather than opponents. Both photographers and videographers are at the wedding with the same goal – to capture wonderful videos and photos. It’s about the couple and their special day, and your goal is to save it for them. So, help each other out.

Timing

Timing can be a major problem and the main cause of disagreement between photographers and videographers. There’s often too little time for both of them to take the shots/video, and that’s when impatience comes along.

You can overcome this by communicating to each other before the wedding. Ask the couple who their photographer/videographer is, so you two can make a plan and a timeline. Even if you only get to meet each other at the wedding, it’s still important to talk. Meet, make a short plan and check who uses which gear so you can plan it out.

In some cases, you can shoot simultaneously. For example, if the photographer shoots with a 24mm lens, the videographer can use a 200mm lens and stand back, so they can shoot at the same time.

Shooting in a bridal room is difficult, because it’s a small space, yet it can get pretty crammed. In this case, Robbie suggests the photographer should take the shots first, and the videographer comes next. You can reenact some scenes, like buttoning up the wedding dress.

The reception

The reception is where many important moments need to be captured, such as the first dance, for example. And in these moments everyone wants to take the best possible shot or video. This is where both the photographer and the videographer should develop the tactics and technique not to get into each other’s way, and still take good shots.

Robbie likes to do one 360 video and then grab a monopod and go in the back to go on filming. This way he isn’t in anyone’s way and the photographer can get the photos. While the photographer is taking shots from the crowd, Robbie likes to hide behind his light stand, the pole or at the DJ.

All in all, make sure to look after each other and again – communicate. Robbie points out communication as the key element of a successful wedding photo and video shoot. Play nice and remember – you both have the same goal.

[How to Work with Wedding Videographers: Breathe Your Passion with Vanessa Joy | Adorama TV]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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2 responses to “How wedding photographers and videographers can stop grabbing each other by the throat”

  1. Albion Bowers Avatar
    Albion Bowers

    I’m a pretty serious amateur photographer. I shoot landscapes outdoors. And I’ve been to many, many weddings. A recent trend I’ve seen in the last 20 years or so is the rise of the arrogant self-important photographer/videographer. The wedding is a celebration of two people committing their lives to each other, and family and friends to celebrate that with them. But lately the family and friends are being pushed aside by the imposing pro imagers doing their work, leaving family and friends staring at the backs of the image entourage. And while I’m sitting in the back row watching the parade of assistants, I think about my own work. Zero impact. I take only photos, and I try to not even leave footprints (erosion). No one ever knows I was there, except for my images. As this article never even mentions the couple, or the family and friends, and the impact the “Pro Imagers” are leaving all over their experience, this is a failure of ethics. Henri Cartier-Bresson never imposed himself on those he captured for his art. Would that a modern generation learn that same lesson…

  2. urmirahmam Avatar
    urmirahmam

    Fotografo & Videomaker
    Andrea Sartore based in Forlì Emilia-Romagna, links his prolific activity in fashion photography, works throughout the national and international territory as a photographer and lecturer in lighting technology. It creates advertising photographic services, catalogs and advertising campaigns, follows photographic workshops, model-sharing, photography and photoshop courses.