Get your Color Theory game on point with this fantastic video

Feb 17, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Get your Color Theory game on point with this fantastic video

Feb 17, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Color is something that’s on my mind a lot throughout the shoot process. It’s something to consider when planning, shooting or doing post work. This video from motion graphics artist Rhea Lelina Manglapus does a decent job at making color theory both fun to watch and pretty easy to grasp.

Starting with the basics, Rhea takes us on a journey that packs a lot of information into a relatively short amount of time. If you have started to dive into color (which we have lately), this would be a great refresher.

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Without getting into the debate myself, there is some argument out there on exactly what constitutes the primary colours.  I’m going to leave that one to those in the comments section.

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Understanding hues and the relationships between them can greatly improve the color coordination of your images.

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Color is important, even if you ultimately convert the shot to black & white, and color theory is a topic that I think can’t really be research too much.  There’s far more to the theory and psychology of color than many of us can even imagine, but this video is a decent start.

But don’t stop there!  There’s a mountain of information out there on the web, and plenty right here on DIY Photography.

A couple of tools that I find often invaluable for choosing color schemes are the Adobe Color Wheel (formerly known as Adobe Kuler) and the Color Guide palette from within Adobe Illustrator.

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What tools do you use to help with choosing color themes for your work?

[Rhea Lelina Manglapus via Behance]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “Get your Color Theory game on point with this fantastic video”

  1. Matt Owen Avatar
    Matt Owen

    I use paletton (http://paletton.com/), I find it more intuitive than Adobe’s tool and the exported palettes look pretty cool.