G-Technology shows how their kit can integrate into DIT carts on movie shoots

Apr 16, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

G-Technology shows how their kit can integrate into DIT carts on movie shoots

Apr 16, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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The Digital Imaging Technician Cart (or “DIT Cart”) is where all of the media is ingested from a shoot and organised once it’s captured. G-Technology was showing off how some of their kit integrates into a DIT cart at NAB 2019, so we had a chat with them to find out more about it and how it helps with film set workflow.

The goal of the DIT Cart is to be able to ingest media and have it available quickly. It’s a workflow efficiency thing to save as much time as possible. On most video and film sets, time is the most expensive part of the whole production, so anything that saves time on set is extremely valuable.

The DIT Cart being shown at NAB 2019 isn’t a standard kit that G-Technology sells. Every DIY Cart is unique and personal to the person who uses it, filled with the tech they find most useful and reliable. But G-Technology offers a number of products which are easily at home on any typical DIT cart. At the heart of this one is the G-Technology Shuttle. It allows for transfer from multiple types of devices, including storage from systems such as RED and Atomos, and offers the ability to automatically create backups as you pull new media in.

A DIY cart isn’t something I’ve ever used on the shoots I’ve done. None of the productions I’ve worked on have had that kind of budget or urgency. But when you need to work quickly and efficiently on-set, they make a whole lot of sense.

What gear would you have on your cart?

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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