Webb’s near-infrared eye captures a remarkable view of Saturn

Jul 4, 2023

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Webb’s near-infrared eye captures a remarkable view of Saturn

Jul 4, 2023

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope recently had the first look at Saturn. Using its Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), the first glimpses of the planet were beautiful and mystical, even just as raw, black-and-white images. But the processed, colorized version is here, giving us a closer look into Saturn and its famous rings.

This image shows Saturn and its rings, but also some of the planet’s moons: Dione, Enceladus, and Tethys. It’s a product of the Webb Guaranteed Time Observation program 1247, which included several deep exposures of Saturn. The program was put in place to test the telescope’s ability to detect faint moons orbiting the planet and its bright rings.

In the view of Webb’s NIRCam, Saturn appears exceptionally dark. This is due to the planet’s methane gas, which absorbs almost all sunlight falling on its atmosphere. Conversely, the icy rings remain relatively bright, and it looks as if they’re glowing. This certainly adds a mystical mood to the image, but there’s more to it than just being beautiful.

The new image reveals intricate details within both Saturn’s ring system and its moons. Additional deep exposures will allow the team to examine some of the planet’s fainter rings, including the thin G ring and the diffuse E ring, which aren’t visible in the initial image. The discovery of new moons could offer valuable insights into the current and past conditions of the Saturnian system.

This photo also captures Saturn’s atmosphere with surprising detail. Although the Cassini spacecraft has previously provided clearer observations, this is the first time we’ve seen Saturn’s atmosphere with this level of clarity at this specific wavelength (3.23 microns), an ability unique to JWST.

Saturn’s atmosphere and rings have been studied for decades by missions such as NASA’s Pioneer 11, Voyagers 1 and 2, the Cassini spacecraft, and the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations from Webb are just a glimpse of the new insights this observatory could add to Saturn’s story in the coming years. And even though most of us following JWST’s photos aren’t scientists, I’m sure that you, like me, look forward to its future discoveries.

Science Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Matt Tiscareno (SETI Institute), Matt Hedman (University of Idaho), Maryame El Moutamid (Cornell University), Mark Showalter (SETI Institute), Leigh Fletcher (University of Leicester), Heidi Hammel (AURA)

Image Processing Credits: J. DePasquale (STScI)

[via Digital Trends]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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