Watch a DJI Mavic 2 Pro hit a car windshield at 62.5mph

Apr 12, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Watch a DJI Mavic 2 Pro hit a car windshield at 62.5mph

Apr 12, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Impacts are always fun videos to watch, especially in slow motion and even more so when it results in something being completely obliterated. Well, we’ve got the impact and the slow-motion but not so much of the obliteration in this video. It was created in partnership with the Virginia Tech Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership, the College of Engineering, and State Farm to evaluate drone collision risks with a moving vehicle.

Almost as soon as the video starts, a DJI Mavic 2 Pro enters the frame and hits the windshield of the car. But instead of smashing to bits, there’s a bit of bending and then it just skims off the top, with no immediately obvious damage to either the drone or the windshield – which does a Matrix-like wobble on impact.

The test was performed to help State Farm see what happens if a drone falls out of the sky and lands on a car. Which, as an insurance company who both covers drone pilots and uses them in their own day-to-day operation for inspections and checking claims, is important to know, especially when they need to potentially fly their drones over busy roads.

The footage was part of a submission to the FAA to illustrate the amount of damage a drone falling from the sky would potentially cause to vehicles if it impacted with one. The data helped State Farm get permission from the FAA for them to fly over those busy roads when needed.

[via DroneDJ]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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