Slow Mo Guys push it to the extreme with glass explosions at over 343,000fps

Jul 21, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Slow Mo Guys push it to the extreme with glass explosions at over 343,000fps

Jul 21, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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In the photography world, we’re used to the megapixel and high ISO races. When it comes to video, the race seems to be about frames per second. With frame rates getting ever faster, Vision Research are usually in the lead with their Phantom cameras.

It’s just a regular day at the office for the Slow Mo Guys, making things explode. In this case, Pyrex glass. Using a Phantom V2511, they begin filming at 28,000fps. They soon realised they weren’t anywhere near fast enough and knocked it up to an insane 343,915fps.

YouTube video

Even more insane is that the Phantom v2511 wasn’t even maxed out. While the resolution gets ridiculously small it does go all the way up to 1,000,000fps. Even at 343,915fps, though, the resolution was only a mere 256×144 pixels.

To give you an idea of just how much time gets slowed down at 343,915fps, 5.1 seconds generates over nineteen and a half hours of footage when played back at normal speed. For most subjects, time would appear to stand still.

exploding_glass

For exploding glass, even this frame rate might be too slow. Despite the low resolution, we’re not going to complain. It still looks pretty impressive. It’ll be interesting to see how this footage might look recorded with the latest equipment 5 or 10 years from now.

[via Resource]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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