Twitter for photographers, you’re almost there

Feb 20, 2020

Ole Henrik Skjelstad

Ole Henrik Skjelstad is a Norwegian math teacher and landscape photographer. He fell in love with photography in 2013 when he got a camera as a birthday present. You can follow his work on 500px, IG, and Flickr, and get his tutorials here.

Twitter for photographers, you’re almost there

Feb 20, 2020

Ole Henrik Skjelstad

Ole Henrik Skjelstad is a Norwegian math teacher and landscape photographer. He fell in love with photography in 2013 when he got a camera as a birthday present. You can follow his work on 500px, IG, and Flickr, and get his tutorials here.

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Twitter has developed into a photographer’s dream platform – almost. This fall, the company enabled uploading higher resolutions images, while keeping the quality.

I am not an avid user of Twitter, so yesterday, when I discovered that I can add a dark theme to twitter, I was pleasantly surprised. A dark background is a perfect environment for colors, contrast and shadow detail. Images deserve that.

You can enlarge an image when you click on it, and that is a very cool feature. Twitter also adds a frame that reflects the image’s color theme.

What is lacking is better support for verticals. I uploaded one last evening, and this is how it is displayed in the feed:

You must click on the image before it is displayed properly:

This preview experience leads to verticals getting less attention, and this is unfortunate. Hopefully, Twitter will come up with a good solution for verticals.

I have viewed my images on both a laptop and a cell phone. The viewing experience is far superior to Instagram and Facebook where white is the default backdrop. Facebook has made it possible to click on an image to view it on black. On Instagram, however, you have to set your cell phone to night mode (if your phone has this option) to get a decent viewing experience.

The fact that verticals aren’t cropped like they are on Instagram also speaks to Twitter’s advantage. In addition, the Twitter feed is still chronological.

These new Twitter features encourage me to post more images on the platform. What are your experiences with Twitter? Will you now post more images on the platform?

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Ole Henrik Skjelstad

Ole Henrik Skjelstad

Ole Henrik Skjelstad is a Norwegian math teacher and landscape photographer. He fell in love with photography in 2013 when he got a camera as a birthday present. You can follow his work on 500px, IG, and Flickr, and get his tutorials here.

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4 responses to “Twitter for photographers, you’re almost there”

  1. Marco Peixoto Avatar
    Marco Peixoto

    Neither…

  2. Dunja Djudjic Avatar
    Dunja Djudjic

    Flickr :) I stopped using Twitter alltogether, and Instagram is merely a personal diary, full of everyday/vacation/cat/concert snapshots, and occasional ridiculous selfies :)

    1. Ole Henrik Skjelstad Avatar
      Ole Henrik Skjelstad

      Flickr rules ;) And it is bot-free :))

  3. W Douglas LeBlanc Avatar
    W Douglas LeBlanc

    Which ones will pay us little creators enough to keep our hobbies growing enough to turn into an actual business?