Three important things to consider before switching camera brands

Sep 13, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Three important things to consider before switching camera brands

Sep 13, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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August and September have been pretty exciting as far as gear announcements go. Nikon Z7 and Z6 are out, along with the lenses and adapter. Canon’s full-frame-mirrorless system has also been launched, and Fujifilm X-T3 is out, too. Many photographers are thinking whether to switch systems or gear brands, and it’s a kind of a big decision to make. In this video, Mark Denney discusses three very important things to consider before you make the final decision. Because, when you take everything into consideration – you may not need to buy the new gear after all.

YouTube video

1. The cost

Before you jump into selling all your current gear and buying the new one, check how much you can get for your current setup. Mark did it by visiting B&H and entering the gear he’d like to sell, in order to see how much he would get for it. It came down to around $3,000 for him, but of course, this can differ greatly depending on the gear you own.

Next, you need to see how much money you’ll have to add out of pocket. Mark checked the prices of the Nikon Z7, Canon EOS R or the Fujifilm X-T3, along with the accompanying lenses. For example: to buy the Nikon Z7 + 24-70mm lens, the 35mm f/1.8 lens and the 50mm f/1.8 lens, he’d have to pay around $5,500 in total. With the $3,000 he could get for his current setup, it comes down to paying the additional $2,500 out of pocket. If your budget allows it, it’s great. But if not… maybe it’s not the right time to switch systems now.

All in all, the worth of your current gear and the prices of other systems are definitely something to check before you make the decision.

2. Image/video quality

The next thing to consider is whether the perceived video or image quality will justify the out of pocket cost of switching camera systems. So, another thing you can check online are hands-on reviews and sample photos and footage made with the gear you’re thinking of buying.

Mark has an interesting “blind test” with the photos taken with different gear. Can you really see the difference and guess which photo came from which camera brand?

3. Do you really need to switch systems?

Finally, think about your current setup. Is there anything wrong with it? Is there a big problem you will solve by switching to another brand or from DSLR to mirrorless? And if not: do you really need to switch systems? Because if the upgrade isn’t all that big, it doesn’t really justify the cost of changing all your gear.

After these three considerations, Mark decided that he’s sticking to Sony. Although it could be fun to try new brands and their mirrorless cameras, he doesn’t actually need it.

And what about you? Have you thought of switching systems now that Nikon Z7 and Z6, Canon EOS R and Fujifilm X-T3 have been out? Or you’re sticking with what you’ve got?

[3 QUESTIONS To Ask Before SWITCHING CAMERA BRANDS! | Mark Denney]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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