This is the world’s most advanced “handheld” camera stabiliser rig

Apr 6, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This is the world’s most advanced “handheld” camera stabiliser rig

Apr 6, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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I’m a big fan of gimbals. I have several from companies like Zhiyun and Moza. For my needs, they’re awesome and fit into my different workflows wonderfully. But in the grand scheme of things, the gimbals most of us own pale in comparison to the $50,000+ Arri Trinity – the world’s most advanced camera stabiliser.

Potato Jet got the chance to go speak with one of the masters of the Steadicam, Ari Robbins (before this whole quarantine thing) at the Arri store in Burbank California to check out the Trinity rig that allows him to get some of the most amazing shots you ever saw.

Arri has worked on a lot of movies, including La La Land, Last Flag Flying and, oh yes, Sharknado as well as a number of TV shows and music videos. Some examples of his work are included in Potato Jet’s video, showing he’s more than qualified to talk about the system – which is his own personal kit, not a rental.

The Arri Trinity “basic” rig will cost you over $50,000 and you’ll still need to buy a vest and an arm on top of that (costing around another $20K). That6 also doesn’t include the cost of whatever camera and lens you want to mount to it.

When you watch the ease with which Ari throws it around, you quickly learn how the whole rig has become an extension of Ari himself. He’s able to move it with an ease and fluidity that most of us could only dream of achieving – and with gear that most of us can only ever dream of using. It’s interesting to hear Potato Jet’s first impressions and experiences trying it out briefly, and how different it is from the gimbals us mere mortals use or even regular Steadicam rigs.

I’ll never complain about the weight of the Crane 3 LAB again.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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