The importance of leading lines in photography

Dec 29, 2020

Nicholas Goodden

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

The importance of leading lines in photography

Dec 29, 2020

Nicholas Goodden

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Leading lines in photography are existing lines within the frame of a photograph which the photographer has deliberately aligned/arranged (prior to taking the photo) by adjusting their composition either shifting their body or camera. It should result in lines which “lead” to the subject, increasing the focus of the viewer, allowing for a more enjoyable viewing experience.

It is often paired with the rule of thirds although not necessarily.

Since I started photographing London (back around 2008), I have made a conscious effort to practice and master this as it greatly improves photographs, their impact, and the ease with which a viewer will appreciate your work, a certain user experience I guess.

I include some examples of my London photography so you can see for yourself the importance of leading lines in photography.

I initially applied it to my London urban landscapes but I found as my photography evolved and I began shooting London street photography, it became an automatism, something imprinted in me, sort of like a mind tattoo.

Photography is in fact quite mathematical, at least it can be as mathematical as you want it to be.

I often find, perhaps because I’m so used to it, that I don’t really have to think all that much about leading lines or the rule of thirds in photography. They are omnipresent throughout most of my photography at varying levels. I just know when the shot is right… for me anyway.

I think anyone is capable of knowing when a shot is right, it feels perfectly balanced without requiring the photographer to carry a ruler or obsess over it.

It feels almost relaxing to look at, it makes your eyes, your heart and your mind feel good. As opposed to some photographs which beg you to move on to something else so full are they with “visual noise”, busy, messy, lacking balance.

I hope you enjoyed my thoughts regarding this aspect of photography as well as the few street photography examples of mine I included.

Until next time.

Nico

About the Author

Nicholas “Nico” Goodden is a professional London photographer specializing in urban photography, street photography, and attention grabbing micro video content such as cinemagraphs and timelapse. You can see more of his work on his website and say hi on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. This article was posted here and shared with permission.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

DIPY Icon

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *