Target’s new swimsuit ad campaign goes “Photoshop-free” (or at least, liquify-free)

Mar 24, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Target’s new swimsuit ad campaign goes “Photoshop-free” (or at least, liquify-free)

Mar 24, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Photoshop has received a bit of a backlash over the last few years about its use in advertising.But, it’s not really Adobe’s fault. Photoshop is just a tool. It’s like blaming Ford because you took a wrong turn down a one way street. But, the criticism has made a lot of companies sit up and think. Their average customer doesn’t really look much like the people used in their advertising campaigns. In fact, even the people used in their advertising campaigns don’t look like themselves in the final result a lot of the time.

More and more organisations have started to go “Photoshop free” for their advertising. And Target have now jumped on the trend, to great effect. To promote their new spring swimwear line, the campaign features women of all shapes and sizes, completely unretouched.

Model and body activist Denise Bidot / Target

The series of ads feature a skateboarder (Lizzie Armanto), dancer (Megan Batoon), model (Kamie Crawford) and body activist (Denise Bidot). They wear various swimsuits from Target’s range, and all look pretty fantastic.

Target shows women of all shapes, sizes and colors looking beautiful and confident in themselves and their swimsuits and that resonates with women everywhere.

Confidence is contagious!

– Kamie Crawford

Model Kamie Crawford / Target

You’re bearing the most amount of skin in public when you’re in a swimsuit, so it’s important that it helps you feel confident so you can be completely yourself and enjoy every part of summer without the burden of insecurities.

– Megan Batoon

Dancer, Megan Batoon / Target

As somebody whose human subjects are primarily female, I think campaigns like this are fantastic. And I hope there’s more of them.

There’s so many amazing people out there, male and female, with confidence issues over the way they think they look. As photographers, it’s our job to show them that they really have nothing to worry about. And it can be done without the use of the liquify tool and heavy retouching.

[Target via Today]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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13 responses to “Target’s new swimsuit ad campaign goes “Photoshop-free” (or at least, liquify-free)”

  1. Joshua Palacios Avatar
    Joshua Palacios

    Definitely. I think it’s a great niche to get into as well, natural body photography. In an age of so much plastic and photoshop, it’s always refreshing to see real people, blemishes and all! It instills a confidence back in people that are always comparing themselves to the staged, photoshopped, and plastic surgery ridden world that exists on social media. I have nothing against altering models in images, but it’s just nice to see natural beauty. We are all beautiful and our beauty should be embraced, not always falsely enhanced!

  2. Dunja0712 Avatar
    Dunja0712

    Beautiful!

  3. Don Barnard Avatar
    Don Barnard

    All I want is a simple pie chart symbol in the bottom corner of every commercial image that indicates the extent that photoshop has been used to alter the models appearance. Food has labelling, so should the images used for health, food and beauty products.

    1. Dunja Đuđić Avatar
      Dunja Đuđić

      Great idea!

  4. Don Barnard Avatar
    Don Barnard

    All I want is a simple pie chart symbol in the bottom corner of every commercial image that indicates the extent that photoshop has been used to alter the models appearance. Food has labelling, so should the images used for health, fitness, food and beauty products.

    1. Dunja Đuđić Avatar
      Dunja Đuđić

      Great idea!

    2. Nick Dunlap Avatar
      Nick Dunlap

      damn genius

    3. Mike Avatar
      Mike

      Also a list of all the filters techniques used.

  5. John G Schickler Avatar
    John G Schickler

    There are basically no “Photoshop-free” images used in magazines. Since all (or nearly all) professionals shoot RAW, unprocessed images would look like crap.

  6. AsianReaper Avatar
    AsianReaper

    Personally if I want reality I’ll step outside , advertising is for promoting an ideal to strive for . These people basically say it’s ok to be 20+ pounds overweight and it’s not at all .

    1. Mike Avatar
      Mike

      What is the point of ads with size zero models if the target consumer is not?

    2. Renlish Avatar
      Renlish

      Care-troll. There’s always one. WOMEN – who are the main demographic for bikini ads in Target catalogues – appreciate seeing clothes modeled on bodies that they can relate to. If you want fantasy of disturbing images where females look like underage boys, then go pick up a copy of Vogue or any other high-end mag where they photoshop the models to the enth degree and wear clothes that only those in the 1% can actually afford.

  7. matt10023 Avatar
    matt10023

    Why do the present minority Latina and AA women in plus sizes? The dancer, who appears white, is extremely fit. Somehow this seems more calculated than suggested.