Stabilens means never rebalancing your gimbal when you swap lenses

Nov 4, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Stabilens means never rebalancing your gimbal when you swap lenses

Nov 4, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

YouTube video

One of the big issues with motorised 3-axis gimbals is that you have to balance them. And if you’re regularly changing lenses while you shoot, that means you could rebalancing them a whole lot during the course of your day. Zac Miller at Stabilens thinks he’s figured out a solution to this problem. We caught up with Zac at PhotoPlus 2019 to see his solution.

The Stabilens is essentially a weighted ring that goes around your lens, acting as a counterbalance so that you can get the same centre of gravity with multiple setups. This way when you swap your lenses, you don’t have to rebalance your gimbal at all. You just take one lens off, put another one on, and carry on as you were.

The expandable ring holds up to 20 weights, allowing you to add up to about half a pound of weight to your lens. It stretches to fit any lens between 58mm and 100mm, although a larger version for broadcast lenses is expected in the future.

You don’t have to add all that weight, though. In a handheld gimbal, keeping things as light as possible is often key, especially on a long day. So, you can easily remove weights and have the ring further out towards the end of the lens to keep that balance where required.

It’s an interesting solution to the problem, for those that face it. But is the extra weight worth the time saved?

A final price for the Stabilens has not yet been determined, but it is expected to be available for pre-order through the Stabilens website in the next month or so.

DIYP’s coverage of PhotoPlus Expo 2019 is sponsored by Luminar, Cosyspeed, PhotoPlus, and Spiffy Gear – check ’em out.

We’re giving away photo bags, software and lights – join the giveaway here.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 responses to “Stabilens means never rebalancing your gimbal when you swap lenses”

  1. Freelance cameraman China/HK Avatar
    Freelance cameraman China/HK

    I mostly have a problem with lens getting to heavy and forces me to push the camera on the back.
    If the time you spend on just moving back few millimeters your camera body worth more than the set of ring…. maybe.

  2. Richard Joseph Avatar
    Richard Joseph

    I wouldn’t put any weights on my lens.