Shooting an abandoned building with a pinhole camera yields magical images

May 5, 2018

Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa is a freelance writer and photographer currently based in Florida. When not traveling, he likes to spend his time printing pictures in the darkroom.

Shooting an abandoned building with a pinhole camera yields magical images

May 5, 2018

Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa is a freelance writer and photographer currently based in Florida. When not traveling, he likes to spend his time printing pictures in the darkroom.

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We may live in an era where high-resolution digital cameras are kings, but as photographer Steve O’Nions shows in this video, sometimes all it takes a simple camera to add some magic to an image.

YouTube video

Steve O’Nions found a crumbling, derelict building in a remote part of Wales and decided to shoot it with a Zero Image 2000 pinhole camera. He used a Fomapan 100 classic film for his shots and ended up with dreamy images such as the one you see below.

Pinhole cameras can be quite challenging to use. Most of them don’t even have a viewfinder, so you often have to guess your composition. O’Nions shares that “it pays to be bold” when you’re photographing with such a rudimentary device. Since pinholes produce a super wide angle view, you have to be careful which part of the scene you want to include in your shot.

It appears that O’Nions is in tune with his pinhole camera as the photos he got from his little excursion turned out to be quite impressive. Anyone else who tries this could easily fail if they don’t know how to use this type of camera.

Apart from using pinhole cameras, he also uses large format field cameras. To see more of his landscape photos, feel free to visit his Youtube channel.

[A Welsh slate works and a pinhole camera | Steve O’Nions ]

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Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa

Chad Verzosa is a freelance writer and photographer currently based in Florida. When not traveling, he likes to spend his time printing pictures in the darkroom.

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