Protect your gear from rain and snow for less than $1

Aug 23, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Protect your gear from rain and snow for less than $1

Aug 23, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

protect_your_gear

These days, most cameras and lens build quality is pretty high. Even if not completely weather sealed they can still take quite a lot of abuse from nature. Sometimes, though, you do want to take the extra step to protect your kit.

Landscape Photographer Benjamin Jaworskyj has a great tip to help cover your gear at virtually no cost. I used to use one of the more expensive solutions. It worked rather well, but it always did feel like overkill. This solution is much easier, and uses less room in your camera bag.

YouTube video

All you need is a plastic trash bag or grocery bag and a rubber band. A very quick and simple solution, and very handy here in the UK where it rains year round, no matter what season it’s supposed to be.

Sure, you could be fancy and spend the whole dollar if you wish. I think most of us would have these items already, though. I always have a couple of trash bags in my camera bag anyway, just so that I don’t forget them when camping. Now they have another potential purpose.

This tip can also work with flash. Whenever I use flash on location and expect it might rain, I take a roll of big black trash bags with me. Then, I gaffer tape those to the outside of the softbox and have them hanging over the flash unit to protect it. You won’t be able to use optical slave modes or AWL/CLS, though, so don’t forget radio triggers.

What other tips do you have for helping your gear survive the weather? Let us know in the comments.

[via ISO1200]

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

31 responses to “Protect your gear from rain and snow for less than $1”

  1. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  2. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  3. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  4. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  5. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  6. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  7. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  8. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  9. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  10. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  11. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  12. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  13. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  14. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  15. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  16. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  17. Scott Sherman Avatar
    Scott Sherman

    You can also screw your lens hood over the bag. Should be enough clearance on most for threads to catch the bag.

  18. ArtsDream Avatar
    ArtsDream

    Actualy, I’m thinking this tips could work also with a dark shirt on a sunny day to help see trhough the viewfinder or the screen :D Thanks !

    1. Tor Ivan Boine Avatar
      Tor Ivan Boine

      like in the old days? :) yep, works well.

  19. doge Avatar
    doge

    I’ll save everyone the trouble of watching a pointless 4 minute video.

    Use a plastic bag.

  20. Eddy Kamera Avatar
    Eddy Kamera

    This is pretty cool.

  21. Stereo Reverb Avatar
    Stereo Reverb

    …Or get a camera rain cover bag from $6.99 to $12.99 on Amazon, specifically fitted to cover your camera, lens, and flash. Also includes drawstrings to seal out additional moisture. Do you trust your $500-$5,000.camera to a grocery bag you found at your local food mart and hope it protects your lens and electronics? In an absolute emergency, sure, but why not just go ahead, get the bag and stuff it in one of your camera bag pockets. I’ve done just that and can tell you from experience, it saved both my camera and my shoot. (Just search for “camera rain cover” in Amazon)

    And btw,, the article is overly embellishing the cost of the example bag (i.e. ‘expensive solution’) for the purpose of this story- yes, that bag is $32 bucks, but i’ve never paid more than $8 or $10 for a cover, and that was for a 2-pack.

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      Not overly embellishing anything. I linked that one, because that is the one I owned. Are you suggesting that $32 is not expensive?

      1. Nurkules Avatar
        Nurkules

        In terms of camera accessories, $32 is absolutely at the cheap end of the scale. Most basic, affordable accessories start around $50 (filters, radio triggers, tripods etc.)

        1. Kaouthia Avatar
          Kaouthia

          Yes, I was comparing to the $7-13 alternatives he alluded to, not completely different products. :)

      2. Stereo Reverb Avatar
        Stereo Reverb

        I’m just saying $32 is not cheap by any means for a camera bag, though it provides a reason for an article on a low cost DIY alternative. Which is great and a great tutorial on making your own bag. But the story is juuuust a tiny bit misleading (sorry!) when it’s not stated that fitted plastic camera bags can be had for just $6…. As well as $32. :)

        1. Kaouthia Avatar
          Kaouthia

          Ok, well, even if you got one for $6, a free plastic carrier bag is still cheaper, yes? Can we agree on that? :)

  22. Kay O. Sweaver Avatar
    Kay O. Sweaver

    Maybe the A7 should come with a plastic bag, given its vulnerability to moisture. ;) :P

    1. DaBigNoob Avatar
      DaBigNoob

      Nah, Sony will charge $100 extra for the plastic bag

  23. Heinz-Jörg Wurzbacher Avatar
    Heinz-Jörg Wurzbacher

    Yawn, that’s old stuff. Nothing new. I am using this kind of protecting the camera and the lens for more than 10 years when taking pictures at sports events. I have always some spare plastics bags and rubber band inside my camera bag.