Placing a camera under a running tap creates an awesome in-camera water tunnel effect

May 29, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Placing a camera under a running tap creates an awesome in-camera water tunnel effect

May 29, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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It’s like going through the Stargate, or at least down the water slides at the local pool. This very neat effect was created by YouTuber digi47. He says that he “didn’t realise it would create such a cool effect”. But a cool effect is exactly what it makes.

I wouldn’t recommend trying this with a DSLR unless you have an underwater housing. Even then, though, the lens itself might be too large to really get the full effect, and the larger sensor might not even allow you to focus so closely. But if you have something like a GoPro, or a relatively water resistant phone, then sure, why not?

YouTube video

I find the physics behind it also pretty interesting. We can see straight up the shaft of water to the tap because there’s an unbroken path  of water between the two. It’s like looking underwater at a swimming pool wearing goggles. Those things that look like water droplets at the top are actually air bubbles. They get sucked into the “tunnel” at the top, and then rise back off.

Do be sure that whatever camera or phone you use is actually going to survive if you give this a try yourself.

[via Laughing Squid]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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2 responses to “Placing a camera under a running tap creates an awesome in-camera water tunnel effect”

  1. Dan Cannella Avatar
    Dan Cannella

    Unscheduled off world activation

  2. Kriztoper Avatar
    Kriztoper

    I didn’t expect that :), good find