No more Canon Flagship DSLRs says CEO

Dec 30, 2021

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

No more Canon Flagship DSLRs says CEO

Dec 30, 2021

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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Canon’s Chairman and CEO Fujio Mitarai has said that the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III will be Canon’s last flagship DSLR.

Mitari told Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun in an interview that the company would no longer be producing DSLR cameras, and will be focusing on their mirrorless line-up in the future.

“It is natural that mirrorless cameras will become the mainstream of digital cameras… The market needs are acceleratingly shifting to mirrorless cameras. In line with this, we are steadily shifting manufacturing” Mitarai says.

But don’t despair if you’re enamoured with Canon’s excellent DSLR offering. According to Mitarai, Canon will end the development and production of the flagship model of the digital SLR cameras a few years from now, and this statement specifically refers to its flagship models, not all DSLRs.

Canon’s SLR flagship model is known as the “EOS-1” series, the first of which appeared in 1989. The latest model EOS-1D X Mark III released in 2020 will be the last model in fact.

– Fujio Mitari, Chairman and CEO Canon

Canon confirmed to Petapixel that they “plan to make future flagship models strictly mirrorless cameras”, and are obviously considering an RF mount as their next flagship model.

The Canon 1DX Mark III was announced in January 2020 and with a price of over $6000 continues to be a popular choice for photo-journalists.

In January 2020 the company halted production on EF lenses unless there is greater demand from the market. I think it is fairly clear then where Canon is headed, that is, fully forward towards the mirrorless RF system. But is this a bad thing and does it really matter?

For me, there’s no going back to a DSLR after my mirrorless. Yes, they continue to be good cameras and I’ll happily use them as a backup, but I just enjoy the advantages of the mirrorless system too much.

Have you switched to mirrorless and if so, would you go back to a DSLR?

[Via Petapixel]

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Alex Baker

Alex Baker

Alex Baker is a portrait and lifestyle driven photographer based in Valencia, Spain. She works on a range of projects from commercial to fine art and has had work featured in publications such as The Daily Mail, Conde Nast Traveller and El Mundo, and has exhibited work across Europe

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5 responses to “No more Canon Flagship DSLRs says CEO”

  1. JCWDZ88 Avatar
    JCWDZ88

    In my humble opinion this is a huge mistake by Canon. I’m not a “pro” nor do I aspire to be one. I love the hobby and want to keep it as a hobby. This year I was going to make the move to mirrorless. It was time for a new body. Shopping and reviews led me in that direction. I sat and looked at a bag full of Canon lenses. Could I use those? Will the image quality be the same? Will I have to replaces those lenses? Then, I learned “Oh yeah, those lenses will be fine. You just need an adapter”. “Okay, how much is the adapter?” “Only a little over $200”. “Yep, Okay include an adapter”. “Oh, there are none available and we don’t know when they will be. Then, the new camera will be 50 megapixels! Wow that’s great. But that will also mean a new computer and more hard drives. Hmmm, the 5D MK IV is 30 mp. That’s enough over my MK III for whatever I’m going to do. “But, the mirrorless is smaller and lighter”. Yep, it is. But, it doesn’t feel as good as the MK IV does. And, when you hang a 200mm macro or a 100-400 on that advantage goes away. And, Canon, if I need a new lens and you’re not making lenses anymore, Sigma and Tamron are decent products. Sorry to see you go out this way and maybe this is the way of the future. I don’t see that much of an advantage.

    1. Rick Scheibner Avatar
      Rick Scheibner

      I can’t argue with your reasoning. That said, Canon is going to look out for their bottom line and not that of guys like you and me. They all do.

    2. David Avatar
      David

      R mount adaptors were in short supply (amongst many other items) but can be sourced from a number of suppliers. The R5 has 45mp but the R6 has 20mp. There should be no reason to upgrade your PC if you transition from 5Diii to R6.
      I migrated from 5Diii to 5Riv to R5 and have never looked back in each case.
      If file size is critical then you can shoot in cRaw format which is a lossy compression but reviews demonstrate that the visible difference between cRaw and raw is slight to non-visible,
      Canon doesn’t make a 200mm macro to my knowledge. They do have 180mm macro though and IBIS in R5/R6 should assist to some extent over using it with 5Diii/iv
      I have the RF100-500mm and it matches perfectly with the R5. The additional 100mm focal range over the EF100-400mm +1.4x is so much lighter and easy to use. Yes, it is expensive but you can still use the EF version without any penalty.
      Canon are still making EF lenses. They discontinued 24 lenses but there is plenty of stock and they will still make existing EF lenses where people want them.
      Sigma and Tampon are decent lenses and they make EF versions. There aren’t any RF versions though but you can adapt the EF versions without any problems.

  2. John Beatty Avatar
    John Beatty

    If anyone is so surprised by this, well you don’t know Canon. I’ve used Canon since ’76. With a large collection of bodies and FD lenses I was forced to sell and require equipment for then “new” EF mount lens/bodies. So, here we are again. You always have the option of adapt or discard. I have found that complaining fulfills nothing.

  3. David Avatar
    David

    It appeared that only 24 EF lenses were discontinued but that stock was still clearly available and support will be available for a long time to come.

    The full comment from Canon was “Canon is committed to new, existing, and future users of the EOS System and will continue to provide a full range of options to users whatever their creative ambitions. We have a diverse collection of EF lenses available and will continue to manufacture and market them where there is customer demand.”

    There will be customer demand for many EF lenses for a long time as either the RF version is significantly more expensive (but tends to have better features) or that there is no equivalent RF version. In any case, EF lenses (and particularly good second hand versions) offer a great mid (and low) price point for a given focal range. For instance, I won’t be upgrading my EF8-15mm/4 as there isn’t an equivalent RF version. My EF16-35mm/4 is brilliant as is and the RF version is significantly more expensive albeit it goes to 14mm. If my lens is damaged then it will be tough decision whether to replace with EF or RF version