NASA just shared photos of an exploding meteor, and it equals to ten atomic bombs going off at once

Mar 28, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

NASA just shared photos of an exploding meteor, and it equals to ten atomic bombs going off at once

Mar 28, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Did you know that three months ago a meteor exploded 16 miles above the Earth? What’s more, it released the amount of energy ten times stronger than the atomic bomb blast over Hiroshima during World War II. NASA managed to capture the large meteor explosion, and it has recently shared impressive images and an animation with the public.

On 18 December 2018, a large “fireball” exploded about 16 miles (26 km) above the Earth, releasing an estimated 173 kilotons of energy. The explosion happened above the Bering Sea, so it was far enough to pose no threat, as NASA explains.

NASA shared an image sequence which shows views from five of nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. In the sequence, you can see the shadow of the meteor’s trail on the clouds and the orange-tinted cloud that the fireball left behind.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL-Caltech, MISR Team

There’s also a still image captured by NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. This true-color photo showing the remnants of a meteor’s passage: it’s the dark shadow cast on thick, white clouds.

Credit: NASA GSFC

According to NASA, this fireball was “the most powerful meteor to be observed since 2013.” It was far enough from the land, so it didn’t pose a danger to anyone on the ground. But, NASA adds that fireballs actually occur fairly often, which sounds equally impressive and scary, don’t you agree?

[via NASA]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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2 responses to “NASA just shared photos of an exploding meteor, and it equals to ten atomic bombs going off at once”

  1. Marc Kievits Avatar
    Marc Kievits

    They got a website to track those thing: https://cneos.jpl.nasa.gov/fireballs/

  2. Charlie Muller Avatar
    Charlie Muller

    kind- not size…. words change meaning