What it’s like to shoot behind the scenes on tour with Bon Jovi

Dec 12, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

What it’s like to shoot behind the scenes on tour with Bon Jovi

Dec 12, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Photographing huge gigs like those of acts like Bon Jovi is the dream of just about every would-be concert photographer. To go on tour with them, get exclusive behind the scenes access, and have millions of people see your work? Well, that’s just fantasy. For most of us, at least. But for photographer David Bergman, that’s been his reality for the past seven years.

This video from AdoramaTV profiles David’s journey as a concert photographer. David talks about how he started off his career, and shot for big clients including Sports Illustrated, through to finding himself touring with Bon Jovi.

YouTube video

It’s not much of a secret that I’m a big fan of seeing how others work and hearing about their photographic journey. Every photographer’s path to success is different. You can’t really follow in the footsteps of others to get where they are, especially today. But it’s interesting to hear about the opportunities they took advantage of, the choices they made and regrets they may have had.

It’s easy to get caught up in the work and the tough parts. Every once in a while put down the cameras, stake a step back, enjoy what’s going on around you, and have a whole lot of fun

– David Bergman

Hearing about the equipment others use and their general workflow is always interesting, too. Whether it’s a whole truck full of gear or one camera and one lens. It impresses upon the viewer the need to have an array of kit for certain jobs, as well as the times when the gear really doesn’t matter.

And speaking of gear, David says that he used to use all f/2.8 zooms. But with the ISO performance of today’s cameras, he doesn’t feel the need any more. David shoots three Canon 1DX Mark II cameras, along with a 24-105mm f/4 on the first, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 for the second and a remote camera on stage with the 16-35mm f/4.

David talks a little about the business side of things, and how the scene is evolving. The path that got him to where he is doesn’t even exist anymore. It’s not relevant. But there’s more need now for imagery than ever in history. He says that “somebody has to produce that and somebody’s getting paid for that”

Find your niche, whatever that is for you, and discover your own path.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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