Infinite Tools new Infinite Luma panel lets you create luminosity masks the easy way

Nov 5, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Infinite Tools new Infinite Luma panel lets you create luminosity masks the easy way

Nov 5, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Luminosity masks are one of the most powerful tools available in photo editing software. But they can be a pain to create manually, and while you can create actions to make a set for you, sometimes you need a little more control and accuracy.

That’s where Infinite Tools’ new Infinite Luma panel comes into play to help you create luminosity masks with ease. You get a lot of control over exactly which brightness range you’re targeting and exactly what you want to do with that range – Do you want to create a selection? Apply it to an existing mask? Or a group? Or just make an alpha channel?

Luminosity masks can be particularly for things like landscape photography, where the dynamic range of the scene means you might have to merge multiple images together to retain all the details in both the highlights and the shadows – A topic we’ve covered here on DIYP before, several times. But it can be handy even if you’re not merging bracketed exposures together, too.

Sometimes you just need to select a specific region based on the brightness of certain pixels – what luminosity masks are for – for some random need. Maybe you want to cut an object out of a white background or replace that blown out sky (and don’t want to use Photoshop’s new AI sky replacement features).

Whatever the reason, Infinite Luma makes it a doddle to select just the area you need and apply it to your file in the way that makes the most sense for you.

If you want to find out more, or buy it for yourself for a one-off £39 cost, head on over to the Infinite Tools website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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