Is a full frame camera really worth it?

Jul 18, 2016

Alexander J.E. Bradley

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

Is a full frame camera really worth it?

Jul 18, 2016

Alexander J.E. Bradley

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

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A detailed comparison between the differences offered by a full frame camera. Read the whole blog at www.aperturetours.com/blog

Since I got my Nikon D7000 camera 6 years ago I’ve used it almost everyday. That is a lot of shutter clicks, 148,558 to be exact. So it looks like I will be in the market for a new camera soon as the D7000 is only factory tested to 150,000 clicks. My dilemma is should I go full frame, or stick with my cropped frame. I keep asking myself, is a full frame camera really worth it? I took a Nikon full frame D610 and a Nikon cropped frame D7100 on a test drive around Paris to see the real world differences.

What exactly is a “full frame” camera?

A detailed comparison between the differences offered by a full frame camera. Read the whole blog at www.aperturetours.com/blog
A detailed comparison between the differences offered by a full frame camera. Read the whole blog at www.aperturetours.com/blog

Film was the unchallenged king for a century and the most popular format was 35mm film. It was sometimes referred to as “small format” to differentiate it from “medium format” or “large format” cameras, but for most of us it was the standard film we used. Although called 35mm, it actually measured 36x24mm. When they started making digital cameras they used a smaller sensor than their film counterparts, roughly 24x16mm, but the bodies still took advantage of the same 35mm lens. The smaller sensor size meant there was a part of the image that never made it to the smaller sensor. About a decade ago, developers in Japan decided to increase the size of their sensors to the equivalent of 35mm film and as a very cleaver marketing ploy, called them “full frame” renaming their current cameras as merely “cropped frame”. Makes you feel like you’re missing out right? Lets take a look at some of the key differences.

Crop Factor

The first thing to understand is what is cropped on a cropped frame camera. A 35mm lens on a full frame camera will look wider and capture more image area than the same lens on a cropped frame camera. Basically the optics of the two cameras work the same way, an image passes through all of the elements of glass in a lens, but when it hits the sensor, by having a smaller sensor in a cropped frame camera, only part of the image will make it to your sensor. The result will look as if you took a full frame image and then cropped in. Using the same lens whilst shooting the Column at Bastille, I was able to make the angel larger in my shot in the cropped frame image. This extra zoom is great for wildlife or sports photographers.

COLUMN OF JULY, BASTILLE - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 80-200MM F/2.8 @ 200MM - F/16 - 1/250 - ISO:100
COLUMN OF JULY, BASTILLE – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 80-200MM F/2.8 @ 200MM – F/16 – 1/250 – ISO:100
COLUMN OF JULY, BASTILLE - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 80-200MM F/2.8 @ 200MM - F/16 - 1/250 - ISO:100
COLUMN OF JULY, BASTILLE – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 80-200MM F/2.8 @ 200MM – F/16 – 1/250 – ISO:100

ISO performance

To test out the high ISO performance I thought I would slip into the dark underbelly of Paris and visit the Catacombs. Flash and tripods are not permitted in the museum, and with only some low intensity lighting to illuminate the skulls of the over 6 million dead that lay rest there, it was the perfect testing ground. I shot the two images with the same settings and changed the focal length to mimic the same field of view. From the offset, the D610 looks to have better ISO performance. The D7100 has a pink cast, especially in the shadows as a result of the noise of the image.

CATACOMBS OF PARIS - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 14-24MM F/2.8 @ 21MM - F/2.8 - 1/30 - ISO:6400
CATACOMBS OF PARIS – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 14-24MM F/2.8 @ 21MM – F/2.8 – 1/30 – ISO:6400
CATACOMBS OF PARIS - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 14-24MM F/2.8 @ 14MM - F/2.8 - 1/30 - ISO:6400
CATACOMBS OF PARIS – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 14-24MM F/2.8 @ 14MM – F/2.8 – 1/30 – ISO:6400

The enlargement below is from one of the shadow areas. The full frame is on the left and the cropped frame on the right. I brought up the shadow details and blacks in the processing (the same amount for both images) because grain really starts to look ugly when we do this and I wanted to push them to their limits to check the results. Whilst they are close at normal exposure, by bringing them up like this you can see clearly that the full frame outperforms the cropped frame here.

CATACOMBS OF PARIS - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 @ 21MM ON LEFT, NIKON D7100 @ 14MM ON RIGHT - NIKKOR 14-24MM F/2.8 - F/2.8 - 1/30 - ISO:6400 - CROPPED TO 100%
CATACOMBS OF PARIS – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 @ 21MM ON LEFT, NIKON D7100 @ 14MM ON RIGHT – NIKKOR 14-24MM F/2.8 – F/2.8 – 1/30 – ISO:6400 – CROPPED TO 100%

Dynamic Range

Dynamic Rage is the amount of luminance that can be captured in an image. If a scene has bright whites and dark blacks, you want your camera to have a large enough dynamic range to capture both parts of your image without blowing out to pure white, or clipping to complete blacks. I went down to Port de l’Arsenal for this test and I must admit they look incredibly similar. I feel the full frame image here is a little more contrasty. Looking at the windows and the side of the boat, and then looking at the shadows created by the trees I honestly get confused as to which camera is which.

PORT DE L’ARSENAL - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 60MM - F/16 - 1/100 - ISO:100
PORT DE L’ARSENAL – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 60MM – F/16 – 1/100 – ISO:100
PORT DE L’ARSENAL - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 60MM - F/16 - 1/100 - ISO:100 - CROPPED TO 100%
PORT DE L’ARSENAL – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 60MM – F/16 – 1/100 – ISO:100 – CROPPED TO 100%
PORT DE L’ARSENAL - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 40MM - F/16 - 1/100 - ISO:100
PORT DE L’ARSENAL – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 40MM – F/16 – 1/100 – ISO:100
PORT DE L’ARSENAL - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 40MM - F/16 - 1/100 - ISO:100 - CROPPED TO 100%
PORT DE L’ARSENAL – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 40MM – F/16 – 1/100 – ISO:100 – CROPPED TO 100%

Then I went into the heart of the Latin Quarter to the Pantheon. Whilst at first glance I thought the same as the port. The full frame appeared to be more contrasty and the cropped image was flatter… unless I looked at the shadows of the column on the doors. Whilst still very dark, you can still make out the detail of the patterns in the full frame image, whereas they are almost entirely black in the cropped version.

PANTHÉON - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 67MM - F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100
PANTHÉON – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 67MM – F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100
PANTHÉON - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 67MM - F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100 - CROPPED TO 100%
PANTHÉON – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 67MM – F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100 – CROPPED TO 100%
PANTHÉON - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 45MM - F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100
PANTHÉON – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 45MM – F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100
PANTHÉON - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 45MM - F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100 - CROPPED TO 100%
PANTHÉON – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 45MM – F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100 – CROPPED TO 100%

Full frame equivalent

We often hear that a 50mm lens on a full frame camera is the equivalent of a 75mm on a cropped lens. What we are talking about here is field of view. Field of view of the 50mm on the cropped frame gives me 4 floors of this building in the Latin quarter. If I were to use a 50mm lens on the full frame, I would see the entire 6 floors of the building.  So to get the same 4 floors, I need to use a 75mm on my full frame to get the equivalent field of view.

LATIN QUARTER - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 50MM F/1.8 @ F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100
LATIN QUARTER – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 50MM F/1.8 @ F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100
LATIN QUARTER - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 70-200 MM F/2.8 @ 75MM - F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100
LATIN QUARTER – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 70-200 MM F/2.8 @ 75MM – F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100
LATIN QUARTER - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 50MM F/1.8 @ F/16 - 1/125 - ISO:100
LATIN QUARTER – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 50MM F/1.8 @ F/16 – 1/125 – ISO:100

Whilst it has the equivalent field of view, a 50mm lens is still a 50mm lens on either camera. In this GIF below you can see the difference between lenses whilst shooting the same field of view. The full frame was shot with a 21mm lens, and the cropped frame with a 14mm lens. Both give the same field of view, but because of the nature of the lens, the 14mm on the full frame distorts the perspective more.

PHOTO : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY. NIKON D610 AND D7100
PHOTO : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY. NIKON D610 AND D7100

Does a full frame camera have better Depth of Field?

Yes and no. Technically the depth of field between a Full Frame 50mm lens and a cropped frame 40mm lens should be identical, their field of view will differ as explained above. So to get our foreground subject (which In our example is our coffee cup) to be the same size within the image we will need to either zoom in, or move closer to our subject. If we zoom, we will be compressing the background (and the blur with it) making it look more blurry. If we move physically closer to our subject, we will shorten our focal distance and consequently decrease our depth of field.

PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 34MM F/5.6 - 1/250 - ISO:50
PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 34MM F/5.6 – 1/250 – ISO:50
PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 55MM - F/5.6 - 1/165 - ISO:100
PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 55MM – F/5.6 – 1/165 – ISO:100
PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7100 - NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 36MM F/5.6 - 1/160 - ISO:100
PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7100 – NIKKOR 24-70MM F/2.8 @ 36MM F/5.6 – 1/160 – ISO:100

Availability of Lenses

Canon and Nikon both make lenses specific for cropped frame cameras. Nikon call theirs FX for full frame and DX for cropped. Canon EF-S or EF. Whilst full frame lens will work with both of the different formats, the cropped body lens won’t always work. They are specifically designed for the smaller sensor and therefore have a smaller area to cover. They consequently use less glass and are usually cheaper to manufacture and will weigh considerably less too.

You can mount a cropped frame lens on a full frame camera, but is it worth it? When you shoot your image, the centre of the image will look perfect, but at the edges you will find black fall off from the smaller lens at the edge of the barrel. Nikon has a DX mode feature in their FX cameras that essentially just crops your image back to a DX sensor size. On cannon you will just need to crop the image yourself.

QUARTIER D'ALIGRE - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 18-55MM F/3.5 DX @ 18MM IN FX MODE F/5 - 1/60 - ISO:800
QUARTIER D’ALIGRE – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 18-55MM F/3.5 DX @ 18MM IN FX MODE F/5 – 1/60 – ISO:800

When you choose to operate this way your full frame camera will basically become an expensive cropped frame camera and behave as such with everything else mentioned here. The drawback will be the reduction in megapixels. The d610 has 24mp but only in FX mode. In the DX mode it will drop down to about 10mp. At this point you are far better off using the DX lens on the D7100 and taking full advantage of the 24mp.

QUARTIER D'ALIGRE - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D610 - NIKKOR 18-55MM F/3.5 DX @ 45MM IN FX MODE F/5.3 - 1/60 - ISO:800
QUARTIER D’ALIGRE – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D610 – NIKKOR 18-55MM F/3.5 DX @ 45MM IN FX MODE F/5.3 – 1/60 – ISO:800

The quality of full frame lenses will be better. Both Nikon and Canon don’t make “professional grade” lens in their cropped frame series. But they will be more expensive and heavier for their quality. When choosing a lens you should really consider this. Even if you only have a cropped frame camera now, if you think you might upgrade one day or use it on a 35mm film camera, you might want lenses that will continue to be useful with your new camera rather than having to buy a new arsenal of lenses as well.

Is a ‘cropped’ image smaller?

Whilst the field of view is “cropped” there is no cropping of your actual image. Depending on your camera the physical image size might not be smaller at all. The image size is determined by the megapixels in a camera, not the physical sensor size. So for our test, the 24mp D610 has 24mp, practically the same file dimensions as the 24mp D7100 camera, which, as you guessed, also has 24mp. So if you wanted to print images from your camera, they would both be the same maximum size because the dimensions of your image in pixels between this full frame and cropped frame camera are the same.

PHOTO : MARGOT SIMONNEY - NIKON D700
PHOTO : MARGOT SIMONNEY – NIKON D700

So which format should you choose?

I really enjoyed running these tests and analysing the results from the images around Paris. There were a few surprises in there for me. I expected the full frame camera to outperform the cropped frame hands down, but in reality the differences weren’t as large as I thought. It does appear that the full frame has won the competition, but at what cost? The selection of lens that work with the cropped frame camera is far greater, but the quality of them is far lower. Full frame bodies are by in large more expensive and but even this is changing with new cropped frame cameras becoming more professional, it is really hard to make the justification I need to make the switch. The cropped frame can zoom 1.5 times further, and when I was out shooting the fireworks at Bastille Day, the difference between a 200mm on a cropped frame camera, and the same lens on a full frame camera really makes all the difference to my shot. But if you prefer wider for street photography, then maybe you prefer the 1.5 times wider side of your lens.

BASTILLE DAY - PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY - NIKON D7000 - NIKKOR 80-200MM F/2.8 @ 185MM F/5 - 3 SECONDS - ISO:100
BASTILLE DAY – PHOTOGRAPHY : ALEXANDER J.E. BRADLEY – NIKON D7000 – NIKKOR 80-200MM F/2.8 @ 185MM F/5 – 3 SECONDS – ISO:100

Whilst these two sensors we tested were pretty equally matched, I expect the new nikon D500 cropped frame camera will have a much better sensor than both of them and the results from that will outperform the full frame camera we used here in ISO and dynamic range. Sensors will continue to become better and ISO and dynamic range are both elements that have seen massive improvements. The first full frame cameras would have terrible ISO and dynamic range compared to the modern cropped frame cameras. So ultimately this only leaves Depth of Field as an inherent change in the performance of the two formats. The rest comes down to what feels good in your hand. What other bells and whistles do you want with your camera? The cropped frame D500 offers 4k video whereas the full frame D610, which costs the same price, doesn’t. The D7100 performed remarkably against the D610 and it is half the price. For now, I think I might keep the cropped format, and spend the extra money in some new higher quality lenses to really get the best from both worlds.

About The Author

Alexander J.E. Bradley is the founder of Aperture Tours (formally Paris Photography Tours) and heads up the tours in Paris. A professional photographer for over a decade Alexander enjoys shooting the surreal by mixing dreamlike qualities into his conceptual images. You can join a photography tour with Alexander in Paris here, and view more of Alexander’s work at his website and facebook. This articles was also published here and shared with permission.

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16 responses to “Is a full frame camera really worth it?”

  1. Sean Davis Avatar
    Sean Davis

    I would say yeah. That extra space makes an impact. Been shooting crop for two years, full for one. I see the difference.

  2. David Clunie Avatar
    David Clunie

    I think overall more important in the digital era is the iso sensitivity vs anything else. Cameras in the old days of digital can’t compare to the newer cameras with the increased iso sensitivity and performance so the more data you are able to capture over the dynamic range is more important. For size, its easy to just take photos of sections then stitch them together for a “large” print, and some of the system like google photos does a pretty good job on its own for doing a quick and dirty stitch… So I’d go for a newer crop camera vs an older full frame any day… (if prices were equal of course :) )

    1. Alexander JE Bradley Avatar
      Alexander JE Bradley

      Too true. Running into the golden hour and the blue hour, it is nice to think that you can increase the ISO to 1600 so that you can bring up your shutter speed to avoid hand held blur. With improvements in ISO performance and the cheap cost of cropped frame cameras, it is a good buy for the dollar price.

  3. Ralph Hightower Avatar
    Ralph Hightower

    When I was researching DSLR cameras to buy, I was coming from full frame format, 35mm film; I still use my 36 year old film camera, a Canon A-1, and a used Canon New F-1.
    APS-C has some benefits: being able to “cheat” in the telephoto range by getting a longer reach and lower costs.
    But it has a drawback of being “cheated” on the wide angle side. A 28mm lens becomes a normal lens of 45mm. I enjoy using my 28mm lens.
    I compared the features of my A-1 and F-1 with their respective motor drives and the Canon 5D Mk III was the closest match. Yea, I could’ve switched to Nikon for my DSLR since my Canon FD lenses aren’t compatible with Canon EF mount; but I’ve been with Canon since 1980.

    1. Alexander JE Bradley Avatar
      Alexander JE Bradley

      This is a really good point about cheating the telephoto side of things. I often hear this and was careful to mention you only cheat yourself more telephoto at the expense of cheating yourself out of the wide angle.

  4. Steven Powell Avatar
    Steven Powell

    Yes they are. :)

  5. Michael Goolsby Avatar
    Michael Goolsby

    It still just bothers the heck out of me when I hear about one format or another having a “better” depth of field. There is nothing inherently “better” about the depth of field of one camera than another any more than saying that f4 is better than f5.6. If you want a more shallow DOF, then 35mm sensors might be a better choice for you. If you want a deep depth of field, the APS-C might be a better choice. I frequently used APS-C with wider lenses in things such as indoor wedding receptions with multiple flashes specifically for greater DOF. Likewise, I used full frame sensors will longer lenses in order to minimize DOF (shallow DOF) for soft and romantic bride/groom portraits. They simply are what they are.

  6. Bart De Wit Avatar
    Bart De Wit

    maybe the comparison should have been done with a D750 instead? Still, I’m not sure wether to go FF or stick with crop :-(

    1. Alexander JE Bradley Avatar
      Alexander JE Bradley

      The comparison was made between the D7100 and the D610 because they both have the same version of the sensor.

  7. Matthew Whited Avatar
    Matthew Whited

    You can get that same 1.5 zoom if you just crop the full frame. Their is no difference in the crop if the pixel density is the same in bth cameras. But the full frame is likely to come with a better analog converter and have less noise (mainly due to the extra sensor size helping reduce sensor heat.)

    1. Matthew Whited Avatar
      Matthew Whited

      I’ve done ths test with my D800 and D5100. They have nearly identical pixel density and even when cropped to match the D5100 framing the D800 still takes a better quality picture.

  8. Reed Radcliffe Avatar
    Reed Radcliffe

    If you do what I did, which is keep the D7000 and buy a full frame camera (I bought a D800 but I should have bought a D750 first), when your D7000 shutter fails (mine did at 110k clicks) it will only cost around $200 to replace the shutter. Then you can have a piece of both worlds and have a back-up camera as well. I have all my DSLRs still because each one of them has it’s own strength that I can’t give up. When they break I get them fixed even if they are out of warranty. The cost to do that is pretty low. I have my first D300 (been to the shop twice), a D7000 (shutter replaced after 2 years), a D800 (repaired after being dropped – twice) and a D750 (bought as a backup to the D800 when I sent it in to be repaired). So now I have both crop frame and full frame cameras and a backup to each. I’m a real estate photographer and I shoot around 4 – 6k frames a week (I shoot brackets for enFuse), so I go through some equipment.

  9. Chris Hutcheson Avatar
    Chris Hutcheson

    You might want to consider simply replacing that shutter, if you’re happy with the camera otherwise. I’ve repaired my cameras frequently, and they’re all working fine. Saw a D4 on sale recently for $1700 CDN, and considered buying it, as the shutter replacement runs around $400 here and the camera’s about halfway toward it – much like the one I already have. Great way to get a good backup.

    1. Alexander JE Bradley Avatar
      Alexander JE Bradley

      It has gotten to more than just the shutter. Actually nothing is wrong with the shutter now and tests could suggest it will continue long into the future. But the body is worn, the dials sticky, and other factors. But I will be keeping it as a backup. It’s a great camera.

  10. David Wiggins Avatar
    David Wiggins

    Not sure if this was mentioned but I think one of the biggest advantages to this whole scenario using crop sensor cameras on full frame lenses. Because you are taking advantage of the sweet spot of the lens, most of the shortcomings of lenses are on the periphery of the lens, so with the crop sensor you are avoiding all of the corner softness, ect.

  11. Frank Nazario Avatar
    Frank Nazario

    it gets old really quick… guys simple if you can afford a full frame and the consequences ( Lenses for FF and blah blah blah blah ) and you want to make a “statement” with your clients or potential commercial clients for “perceived campaign value” then please get a full frame and don’t look back… now, IF you are a conscious business photographer that needs value and your ROI is always in the back of your mind, please for the sake of sanity get an APS-C sensor camera with the new premium DX (cropped) lenses, like the Sigma Art line and be the happiest camper in the world (ANYTHING and I mean ANYTHING that a FF can give you can be achieved with the correct lens selection and post editing) please buy the newer cropped sensor cameras as the difference in performance from the FF specially with premium lenses attached IS NEGLIGIBLE !!! (3 minutes in LR or PS CR and you are done)