Fujifilm announce new X-T20 and X100F bodies and a $6,499 price tag on the medium format GFX

Jan 19, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Fujifilm announce new X-T20 and X100F bodies and a $6,499 price tag on the medium format GFX

Jan 19, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Fujifilm have today announced two new X-Series cameras, the X100F and X-T20, along with a new XF 50mm f/2 R WR lens. The X100F represents the fourth generation in the X100 series and comes with the 24.3MP sensor found in the higher end X-Pro2 and X-T2 cameras. The X-T20 also comes with the 24.3MP sensor and shoots 4K video. The X100, however, is limited to only 1080p.

Fuji have also given up the price for their new medium format GFX camera. At $6,499 for the body alone, it’s certainly not a cheap camera. Compared to its nearest neighbour, though, the Hasselblad X1D, there’s a rather substantial difference. On paper, there’s very little difference between the two, although there are a couple of big ones for some potential buyers.

The specs on the X-T20 look very impressive. It has the 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III sensor, shoots up to 5fps and 1/4000th of a second. It also shoots 4K UHD video, has a tilting touchscreen LCD monitor, and the film simulation we’ve come to know and love from Fuji’s X-Series cameras.

Overall, it seems a very worthy upgrade over the X-T10. You gain a touchscreen, 4K UKD, jump up from 16.3 to 24.3MP, raw and jpg buffers that can handle 25 & 62 shots, respectively. The autofocus has also seen a significant upgrade, going from 77 points to 325.

The X100F has also seen a rather significant boost, too. Again, going from the 16.3 to 24.3MP sensor, although this camera does not shoot 4K. The native ISO range has seen a little jump with the top end now going to 12,800. Like its predecessor, it has shutter speeds going all the way up to 1/32,000th of a second. It also features the new 325 point hybrid AF system mentioned above.

The shooting buffer has also gotten bigger, with raw and jpg going to 25 and 60 shots respectively, and it can shoot them at 8 frames per second. It shoots 1080p video at up to 60fps and has an external microphone input. Although this camera offers no touch screen LCD, which may hold it back in today’s market.

The medium format GFX price has also been announced, at $6,499 for the body only. This is $2,500 less expensive than the Hasselblad X1D mirrorless medium format, which comes in at $8,999 body only.

Pricing for three lenses has also been announced.

So, you can get a body and lens for less than the cost of the Hasselblad body alone. The X1D has built in GPS and a faster flash sync. But these are likely only going to be attractive to a limited number of people. The GFX also offers a tilting screen, as well as a top deck display, slightly faster continuous shooting and a significantly faster maximum shutter speed.

The $6,499 cost is interesting, and it seems that rather than try to tap into the relatively small medium shooter market, they’re taking square aim at high end DSLRs. The Canon 1DX Mark II, for example, is only $500 less expensive at $5,999. The Nikon D5 is practically the same price. For those looking to make the leap to a higher end body and better glass, this could be a very viable alternative.

Fujifilm’s GFX 50s mirrorless medium format camera is available to pre-order now at $6,499, and is expected to start shipping on February 23rd.

The Fuji X-T20 is also available to pre-order now for $899. The Fuji X100F can be pre-ordered for $1,299. Both will be available sometime this month.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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6 responses to “Fujifilm announce new X-T20 and X100F bodies and a $6,499 price tag on the medium format GFX”

  1. Jabari Hunt Avatar
    Jabari Hunt

    Thank you Fuji!!!

  2. osc707 Avatar
    osc707

    i don’t know that I’d call the GFX medium format, it’s more like Full”er” format. 60mmx45mm is smallest of what I feel is medium format

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      I tend to agree. With film, I feel even 645 is kinda small. But, technically, anything bigger than 35mm and smaller than 4×5 is “medium format”.

    2. Ralph Hightower Avatar
      Ralph Hightower

      There should be an APS-C type definition for those MF cameras with sensor sizes smaller the 6×4.5cm, 6x6cm, 6x7cm.

  3. Liam Avatar
    Liam

    Though I love the way Fuji have pre-announced their lens lineup and the pricing is good, I’m still gonna wait for the second generation X1D. Hasselblad have already announced a black body coming without the ‘collectors’ price premium. Still don’t see much flexibility in this GFX without leaf-shuttered lenses. I guess you all can tell I shoot mostly people and use flash primarily… As it is now, my D810 can sync at anything I need while Fuji has barely any support with flash/speedlight manufacturers.

  4. Paul Richards Avatar
    Paul Richards

    Why would it steal from the canon or Nikon??? Totally different markets