Five tips for making green screen shots more realistic

Dec 20, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Five tips for making green screen shots more realistic

Dec 20, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Green screen shots can look stunning, or they can be hilariously bad. I’m sure you want to create the former ones, and Ryan Connolly of Film Riot will help you with that. In this video, he shares five essential tips that will make green screen shots more realistic and believable.

1. Camera movement

Adding camera movement will make the scene look more realistic, and there are two ways to do it. One way is to fix the camera and add movement in post. The more effective way is to actually move the camera like you would in the real location. In this case, put some markers on the green screen to make it easier to track later. Extra tip: it’s easier if the markers are green, just choose a different shade of green.

2. Light the character to match the scene

This sounds like a no-brainer, but lighting is often overlooked even though it’s one of the most important aspects of compositing. Think about the lighting of the scene that you are compositing, and light your actor to match the lighting of that scene.

In addition to light, you may need practical effects that are weather-related, so you can blend the scenes together if there’s rain, wind or snow.

3. Light wrap

Light wrap helps the edges of your subject to blend in better with the background. It works best with brightly lit backgrounds; it can be a subtle, but very useful effect that makes the scene look more realistic.

4. Shoot with a wide aperture

If you shoot with a wider aperture to get a shallower depth of field, it can be useful in two ways. First, it lets you blend the subject better with the background. And second, you won’t need to increase the ISO, therefore there will be less noise and the compositing will be easier. However, if you shoot with a wide aperture, remember to blur the background in the post, otherwise, it will look unnatural.

5. Use a higher shutter speed

If you have a lot of movement in the footage, it will create a lot of motion blur and messy edges that are difficult to composite. To solve this problem, shoot with a higher shutter speed. You’ll get sharper edges which make it easier for you to do the compositing work.

However, motion shot this way may look jittery. So, you can always introduce some motion blur in post.

If you wanna try out these techniques, here’s a DIY green screen and a couple of tricks you can do even if you don’t have it.

[5 Must Know Tips for Green Screen Work | Film Riot]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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