FAA releases TRUST – yet another training and testing requirement to fly drones legally

Jun 24, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

FAA releases TRUST – yet another training and testing requirement to fly drones legally

Jun 24, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has released The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST), which is a free online training programme that recreational drone users are required to take and pass before being allowed to fly their drone. Interestingly, even if you have your Part 107 certification for commercial use, you still need to do this, too.

And don’t think you can easily get away without it (not for long, anyway), as you’re legally obligated to present proof of having taken it if asked by the FAA or law enforcement when flying recreationally. And it appears to apply to all drones, even those under the 250g minimum limit.

The test is available to take online through one of sixteen FAA Approved Test Administrators. These are non-governmental organisations, and it’s completely free. The certification also never expires, although if you lose it, you will be required to take it again to get a new one.

The goal seems to be ensuring that drone pilots have at least a minimum level of education about drones before unleashing them on the unsuspecting public. And according to the FAA, the test is impossible to fail. If you answer a question incorrectly, you’ll be told why it’s incorrect and prompted to try again.

Once you get through it all, you’ll get a completion certification which never expires. As mentioned, however, if you lose it, you’ll need to take it again to get another one. This is because neither the FAA nor the test administrators hold any personally identifiable data about those taking the test, so reprinting or reissuing your original certificate is not possible.

You can find out more about TRUST on the FAA website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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6 responses to “FAA releases TRUST – yet another training and testing requirement to fly drones legally”

  1. John Wojciechowski Avatar
    John Wojciechowski

    As long as it’s free. I understand the FAA and public concern over the small group of irresponsible drone operators who don’t care about safety. I’ve seen some of those people out there which is why I haven’t purchased one, yet. I don’t want to be lumped into that group. However, with all good intentions of the FAA, safety will still be an issue regarding certain groups who believe they don’t need to follow rules.

    1. John Regan Avatar
      John Regan

      John Wojciechowski , couldn’t agree more. But, unfortunately, following rules about anything seems to be becoming strictly optional. One drive in or around the city of philadelphia will show you that 95% of people driving a car shouldn’t be.

  2. madara Avatar
    madara

    From Drone U:

    Who should take The Recreational UAS Safety Test?
    Anyone is considered a “recreational flyer” if they fly PURELY for fun or personal enjoyment and not as a commercial operator under Part 107.

    I don’t see anything on the FAA site requiring Part 107 licensees to have it.

    1. Brian Avatar
      Brian

      Your don’t need it if you fly under your part 107. But if you ever fly recreationally you would need to have it then. I plan on getting mine, even though I log my flights under my 107 everytime. It should be really easy if you have your 107.

      1. madara Avatar
        madara

        I would think my 107 license would carry more weight than a print at home certificate. I could see requiring it for rec users, but 107 pilots are help to a higher standard. The US is good at passing laws and restrictions that seem to only affect those of us who follow the rules. Some people are going to always do what they want regardless of rules.

  3. Ulrik Tønnesen Avatar
    Ulrik Tønnesen

    Where I live you can hardly find any spots at all to get a DJI drone to take off due to the no fly zones. My island is super scenic, so it is a real bummer.

    Meanwhile people can drive around in big hunks of metal weighing several tons. Which has the greater lethal potential?

    I have been wanting to get a small drone for a long time, but I feel like it is becomming increasingly harder to even justify buying one, if I can’t even get it off the ground.