A hands on first look at the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III

Oct 17, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

A hands on first look at the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III

Oct 17, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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It’s only just been announced, but The School of Photography was lucky enough to be the first to get their hands on the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III in the UK, so they’ve posted a review video. In it, they put the camera through its paces, testing the camera for both its photography and video abilities, exploring the new features on a model shoot.

Sensor20.4-megapixel Micro Four Thirds Live MOS (2x)
Lens MountMicro Four Thirds
Max resolution20.4-megapixel (50-megapixel “High Res Shot mode)
File formatRAW, JPG
Bit-depth12-Bit
StabilisationSensor shift, 5-axis
Continuous shootingUp to 30fps
4K Video4K DCI up to 24fps / 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) up to 29.97fps
HD VideoFull HD (1920×1080) at 119.88fps)
Focus typeAuto and manual focus
AF PointsPhase detect: 121 (121 Cross-Type) / Phase Detect: 121 points
Viewfinder2.36 million dot EVF
LCD1.04 million dot 3″ articulating touchscreen LCD
ConnectivityWiFi, Bluetooth
Weather seal ratingIPX1
Dimensions4.93 x 3.35 x 1.96″ (125.3 x 85.2 x 49.7mm)
Weight14.6oz (414g)
Launch price$1,199

After going through the key features and differences over the previous version before going into the tests, starting with video. And one of the things that anybody who gets their hands on a camera capable of 120fps does is usually start with that to see how good it looks and if the compression used can hold all the detail. Although the E-M5 Mark III shoots 120fps at a resolution of 1080p, the detail doesn’t look that bad, once you take the YouTube compression into account.

They also test the E-M5 Mark III on a gimbal, too, and thanks to its small size you can use something very lightweight like the Feiyu G6 Plus. And while walking with and around his subject, the camera’s autofocus managed to keep up with things pretty well.

When it comes to the stills side of things, it’s as easy to use as just about any other Olympus camera, as is the quality of the images. A new processor is used in the Mark III, which they say is better and faster are dealing with noise at higher ISO. But let’s have a look at the sample shots.

f 2.8 – 1/125 sec. – ISO 500 – Focal Length 40mm
f 2.8 – 1/125 sec. – ISO 400 – Focal Length 25mm
f 2.8 – 1/125 sec. – ISO 320 – Focal Length 40mm
f 2.8 – 1/125 sec. – ISO 1000 – Focal Length 38mm
f 2.8 – 1/125 sec. – ISO 800 – Focal Length 40mm
f 2.8 – 1/125 sec. – ISO 320 – Focal Length 25mm

If you’ve already bought into the Micro Four Thirds system, it looks like a fairly decent contender for your money, particularly if you shoot handheld often.

The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III is available to pre-order now for $1,199 in black or silver and ships in November.

[via The School of Photography/Images used with permission]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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