23 tips to turn you into a street photography ninja!

May 24, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

23 tips to turn you into a street photography ninja!

May 24, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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The good folks at COOPH are back again, and this time they’ve got together with street photographer Thomas Leuthard to offer some creative and practical tips to help improve your street photography.

This 4 minute video packs a lot of information into a short space of time and I’m sure many will be able to pick up at least one new trick here, even if you’re been doing street photography for a while.

YouTube video

Some of the tips seem a lot like plain old common sense for anybody who’s been doing street photography for a little while, like framing up your shot, and then simply waiting for something to happen.

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Finding new angles is also something that many photographers of all genres learn very early on, but the video includes several tips on how to actually get those angles.

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Some suggestions aren’t so obvious, like using a WiFi enabled camera and watching the liveview feed from your mobile phone to keep your subjects unaware so they continue to act naturally.

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That last one might seem a little sneaky to some, but that’s one of the great things about street photography.  We all have our own moral compass which allows us to get unique shots that others wouldn’t be able to.

What other tips and suggestions can you offer to make somebody’s next street photography outing more successful?  Let us know in the comments.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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3 responses to “23 tips to turn you into a street photography ninja!”

  1. 孟恬 Avatar
    孟恬

    “We all have our own moral compass which allows us to get unique shots that others wouldn’t be able to.”

    The same applies for example for medical human experiments? xD I hate it when people take pictures without asking. In Germany it’s illegal to publish those pictures. Though 95% of times people upload pictures, often close up portrait without permissions, it’s white photographers and poc subjects…

    But well I guess, to keep them acting normaly—as long as you ask afterwards, it’s fine, isn’t it?

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      I feel it’s a little bit different than medical experimentation, because the moral compass here that might hold one person back from getting a certain shot allows them to explore other areas and get images that those who might take more risks would never get.

      Those who take the chances on riskier shots will almost never push the boundaries of the “safe” subjects.

      Here in the UK, it’s not illegal to photograph people in the street without permission. There’s no reasonable expectation of privacy in a public place, and you can even publish and sell those images if you wish.

      The Laws in different countries also have their own moral compass. :)

  2. Liz Cadogan Photographer Avatar
    Liz Cadogan Photographer

    What is the little camera you are using in the video. Looks better than my big noticeable one
    Thanks