YouTube Now Supports 8K Videos, World Still Prefers Cats

Jun 9, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

YouTube Now Supports 8K Videos, World Still Prefers Cats

Jun 9, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

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Online technological offerings just keep getting better and better. I remember the day (in the not-too-distant past) when online videos were low-res garbled messes, yet we still somehow found them to be fascinating and funny.

Now, as filmmaker Luke Neumann recently discovered, YouTube, the giant of all things viral video, apparently supports 8K videos. (It’s okay…I will wait for you to stop dancing before we proceed.)

As Neumann explains in the video description for his latest high-res venture, “4K is so ‘early 2015.’” According to his comments, he shot the footage on a RED Epic Dragon 6K in a vertical orientation and then stitched the footage together with some After Effects wizardry. “Some shots simply scaled up by 125% from 6.1K to meet the 7.6K standard,” he goes on to say.

The significance of shooting in portrait orientation and stitching footage together is that you can create a larger-resolution native file, similar, in theory, to how the world’s largest image was created by stitching together multiple individual stills.

Will we see a large influx in 8K video coming to the web in the near future? Perhaps, but I think there needs to be some more time for native 8K capabilities to catch up as well as the price gap to shrink before filmmakers start adapting it across the board.

[via No Film School]

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Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

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7 responses to “YouTube Now Supports 8K Videos, World Still Prefers Cats”

  1. Marco 2k7 Avatar
    Marco 2k7

    @BlackDukeITA

    8K is now.

    “: YouTube Now Supports 8K Videos, World Still Prefers Cats – http://t.co/FG0jgbED8v”

  2. Thomas Jakob Brablec Avatar
    Thomas Jakob Brablec

    I can’t even play 720p, most people’s monitors can barely take 4K, why bother with such high resolution on a small screen anyway?

    1. Erlin Sierra Avatar
      Erlin Sierra

      My phone plays and records 4k :)
      …the note records in 8k

    2. Thomas Jakob Brablec Avatar
      Thomas Jakob Brablec

      My tablet can take 1080p, never even tried anything better, my phone can barely even turn the browser on since it’s so damn slow and my computer can now only run videos in 480p since it’s slowed down so much in the past year or so. But in case of resolution, my camera’s capable of shooting 5K. haha

      Resolution means nothing unless you do something with the information you have.

  3. Ignasi Jacob Avatar
    Ignasi Jacob

    Megapixel Death Race started.

  4. Alexandre El Ayoubi Avatar
    Alexandre El Ayoubi

    You always plan ahead. It’s not doing the same errors when HD ready came out. We had hd tv but no content. It slowed down people from buying new tv’s.

  5. Dan Miller Avatar
    Dan Miller

    When is enough going to be enough?