Winning photos of 2019 Environmental Photographer of the Year show devastating impact of climate change

Oct 1, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Winning photos of 2019 Environmental Photographer of the Year show devastating impact of climate change

Oct 1, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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© Amdad Hossain/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Sleep Fatigue

The CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year has just announced the winners and shortlisted images of the 2019 contest. All photos are absolutely striking, showing the raw reality of humanity’s and wildlife’s struggle against the impacts of climate change all around the world.

[Editor’s note: some of you may find certain photos disturbing, so viewer discretion is advised]

This competition is run by CIWEM and supported by the UN Environment, Arup and Olympus UK. Terry Fuller, CIWEM chief executive said:

“Climate change is the defining issue of our time and now is the time to act. We need to see action from all sectors of society. This competition showcases the reality of how people are being impacted by the climate all around the world and aims to spread an important message worldwide to inspire big change.”

This year’s Environmental Photographer of the Year is SL Shanth Kumar with his photo High Tide Enters Home. It depicts a huge wave which lashed at a shanty town in Bandra, Mumbai, throwing a 40-year old fisherman out of his home. He was pulled in by the strong currents, and was rescued by fellow fishermen. The reclaimed city of Mumbai is facing an increased risk of coastal flooding as a result of climate change. The city’s land and sea temperatures have been rising causing a corresponding impact on the sea level.

© SL Shant Kumar/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Hightide Enters Home

SL Shanth Kumar said:

“I believe change is a constant phenomenon. Today this change is manifesting in the form of climate change. As a photojournalist, I am seeing it all unfurl before my eyes. I have seen drought, excessive rain, summers getting hotter and winters getting colder. I believe this change is not good and we need to act now otherwise it will impact the generations to come.”

The 2019 Changing Environments Prize was awarded to Sean Gallagher for the photo Tuvalu Beneath the Rising Tide. The photo shows fallen trees lying on a beach as the waves from the Funafuti lagoon in Tuvalu lap around them. “Land erosion has always been a problem for the country, but problems are intensifying as sea levels rise. Rising seas are on the verge of submerging the tiny archipelago’s islands completely under water,” the photographer explains.

© Sean Gallagher/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Tuvalu Beneath the Rising Tide

Eliud Gil Samaniego was awarded this year’s Sustainable Cities Prize for his image Polluted New Year. It shows Mexicali on the 1 January 2018, right after the New Year’s Eve. On that day, the city was one of the most contaminated cities in the world because the pyrotechnics, climate change, geographic location, industry and cars.

© Eliud Gil Samaniego/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Polluted New Year

Water, Equality and Sustainability Prize was awarded to Frederick Dharshie Wissah for the image Water Scarcity, showing a young boy drinking dirty water. This happens due to lack of water points in the area, which has occurred due to deforestation. The photographer explains that a lack of clean water “greatly increases the risk of diarrhoeal diseases as cholera, typhoid fever and dysentery, and other water-borne tropical diseases.”

© Frederick Dharshie Wissah/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Water Scarcity

J Henry Fair won this year’s Climate Action and Energy Prize for the photo Remains of the Forest. The photo captures Hambach Forest which was nearly 12,000 years old when it was bought by a power company to dig for the brown coal buried underneath. “The ancient forest was once the size of Manhattan. Now only 10 percent of it remains.”

© J Henry Fair/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Remains of the Forest

Young Environmental Photographer of the Year was awarded to Neville Ngomane and his photo Desperate Measures. “This rhino is being de-horned in an attempt to protect it from being poached,” the photographer explains, adding that “this was not an easy watch.”

© Neville Kgaugelo Ngomane/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Desperate Measures

The goal of this contest is, above all, to make an impact and inspire change from political leaders, decision-makers, and the general public. But looking at these winning images will make anyone moved. I believe they will inspire many of us to try and make a change, no matter how small it may seem.

Take a look at more photos below, and you can see the full gallery of shortlisted images on CIWEM’s website.

© Ian Wade/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Lungs of the Earth
© Antonio Aragon Renuncio/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
The Plastic Quarry
© Antonio Aragon Renuncio/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Sweet Dreams
© Valerie Leonard/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Invisible
© Amdad Hossain/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Sleep Fatigue
© Şebnem Coşkun/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Trash
© M Yousuf Tushar/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Daily Labor
© Tran Tuan Viet/CIWEM Environmental Photographer of the Year
Heart of the Ocean

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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3 responses to “Winning photos of 2019 Environmental Photographer of the Year show devastating impact of climate change”

  1. damn.eu Avatar
    damn.eu

    Malthusianism at its finest.

  2. JOhn C Avatar
    JOhn C

    ah yes, I recall before global cooling err warming errr climate change all of these countries were stable and prosperous. It’s the weather, not despots and warlords oppressing people that causes this, not lack of resources, no it’s the temperatures of the earth changing for the first time ever. The poorest countries have the most controlling government, so we should give the government more power to fix it. Who understands science. economics and politics more than activist artists LMAO

  3. Anonymous Avatar
    Anonymous

    JOhn C i don’t know maybe humans could have had a contribution to the change in weather