Watch: This is how Kodak made film in the 1950s

Jan 10, 2024

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Watch: This is how Kodak made film in the 1950s

Jan 10, 2024

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

How film is made at Kodak

Not too long ago, we saw a threepart series from Destin Sandlin at Smarter Every Day showing how Kodak makes film. He visited their Rochester, New York factory to see and document the entire process from start to finish.

But how was it made back in the days when film was king? This video from Periscope Films is a short documentary made by Eastman Kodak back in the 1950s. It shows the process as it was back then. It’s not too different to now.

YouTube video

It’s not much different than today

While the process shown in Destin’s videos might be a little more modern and high-tech, the basic principles of the base, emulsion and protective coatings, and how they create and apply them, seem to remain largely the same.

I do have to wonder, though… How many of those machines in that original 1950s video are still up and running today? Did we see any of the machines in that vintage video, still in daily use, pop up in Destin’s videos?

Whether now or 70 years ago, the process of making film is still fascinating to watch.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *