This is how they apply light-sensitive chemicals to film inside the Kodak Factory

Jul 22, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This is how they apply light-sensitive chemicals to film inside the Kodak Factory

Jul 22, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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We’re back in the Kodak factory in Rochester, New York today with Destin from Smarter Every Day. It’s the second part of a three-part series looking into exactly how Kodak makes its film stock for photographers. In part one, we saw a general overview of the mechanical processes involved in making the blank film base and in part two we find out how they actually make it light sensitive.

As with the first video, part two is almost an hour long and goes into a lot of depth into not only how the process is done but why certain choices are made during manufacture, depending on the needs of the final product.

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As with the last video, the amount of access Kodak provided Destin with is something for which photographers the world over, especially ones who’ve been around long enough to make that transition from film to digital, will be thankful. My understanding of the process before these videos was “make a base, coat it with light-sensitive material” but beyond that, I had no idea and seeing the process is absolutely fascinating.

Seeing the process this in-depth and hearing them talk about the challenges they face and why they have to perform certain tasks in a particular way and all of the specialist techniques, machines and even the material choices the machines are made from is just… mind-blowing!

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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